suttee


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Related to suttee: thuggee, Thugee

suttee

(sŭ'tē`, sŭ`tē') [Skt. sati=faithful wife], former Indian funeral practice in which the widow immolated herself on her husband's funeral pyre. The practice of killing a favorite wife on her husband's grave has been found in many parts of the world; it was followed by such peoples as the Thracians, the Scythians, the ancient Egyptians, the Scandinavians, the Chinese, and peoples of Oceania and Africa. Suttee was probably taken over by Hinduism from a more ancient source. Its stated purpose was to expiate the sins of both husband and wife and to ensure the couple's reunion beyond the grave, but it was encouraged by the low regard in which widows were held. The practice was not universal throughout Hindu history. It was abolished by law in British India in 1829, but isolated cases of voluntary suttee have occurred into the 20th cent. See also funeral customsfuneral customs,
rituals surrounding the death of a human being and the subsequent disposition of the corpse. Such rites may serve to mark the passage of a person from life into death, to secure the welfare of the dead, to comfort the living, and to protect the living from the
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 and suicidesuicide
[Lat.,=self-killing], the deliberate taking of one's own life. Suicide may be compulsory, prescribed by custom or enjoined by the authorities, usually as an alternative to death at the hands of others, or it may be committed for personal motives.
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.

Bibliography

See E. J. Thompson, Suttee (1928).

suttee

former practice of self-immolation by widow on husband’s pyre. [Hinduism: Brewer Dictionary, 1049]
References in periodicals archive ?
[...] dass die meisten Witwen ein hochst immorales [sie] Leben fuhren, und dass das Suttee eigentlich ein dem Temperament der hiesigen Frauen wohlangemessenes Institut sei.
(11.) What about slavery, sacrifice, suttee, corporal punishment, etc.?
It is worth noting that among these, Daly's discussions of suttee, foot binding, genital mutilation, and gynecology, in particular, register a shift in method from that which typifies her previous works: they analyze practices found in other cultures more than the religious myths that predominate in those cultures.
Allan Bloom, in his conservative book, The Closing of the American Mind (1987), legitimately attacks moral relativism with an example from Hindu suttee wife burning," but we can aspire to a more complex synthesis that admits the presence of protests within, and our sense of human rights.
Accordingly, these romances accentuate local cultures and customs like Suttee (6), Thuggee (7), child-marriage and female infanticide, and as a result English rule becomes a moral duty that is associated with the suppression of "savage" customs in the name of civilization.
Therefore, one does not proactively impose on anyone else, let alone a whole community, by rescuing someone who is being proactively imposed on (even if the rest of the community chooses to work themselves into a frenzy of outrage about the 'interference' in their traditional customs of suttee, (11) slavery, or stoning, etc.).
In "Beirut, 1983," she identifies with a mother bending over her dead baby and declares, "I knew her milk still flowed, unsummoned." She empathizes as readily with Lieutenant Colonel Edward Ledford, a soldier in the desert, as she does with a woman following her husband onto the funeral pyre in suttee.
"The Gospel According to Jayne Eyre: The Suttee and the Seraglio." The Journal of the Midwest Modern Language Association 35.1: 14-24.
In the early part of the 19th century the British Raj abolished the evil practice of suttee, the evil practice of burning a widow on her husband's funeral fire.
(47) This association of Maori with cannibalism is coupled with reference to a Maori woman following her husband to the grave in a ceremony reminiscent of Indian suttee (Veine, p.
In his characteristically delightful prose, Young narrates the story of one Parthepat Raghaviah Acharya, an early nineteenth-century Teleguized Maratha Brahmin and member, in various capacities, of the British administrative apparatus, who "stepped into the public arena to contest India's orientalization [especially at the College of Fort William in Calcutta] by offering, civilly and collegially, to fill in the information" (69) the British lacked about Indian law and cultural practices such as sati (suttee).
RETHINKING THE "SUTTEE" IN SANTIAGO AVENDANO'S CHRONICLES FROM FEMINIST PERSPECTIVES.