swamp fever


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swamp fever:

see leptospirosisleptospirosis
, febrile disease caused by bacteria of the genus Leptospirae. The disease occurs in dogs, cattle, pigs, sheep, goats, and horses and is transmissible to humans.
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swamp fever

[′swämp ‚fē·vər]
(veterinary medicine)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Right, Lintonville Terrace in Ashington, where the equine disease swamp fever was found, sparking an alert last summer
Blood tests carried out at Ashington by Defra officials revealed one of them was infected with swamp fever.
Many horses with swamp fever die, while those that survive can act as carriers, serving as a source of infection for other horses.
While anyone unfortunate enough to become pregnant during a stay abroad faced the possibility of losing the child in the heat of places like equatorial Africa, to anything from swamp fever to dicey midwifery.
A SECOND horse has died in the West Country after developing the equine disease known as swamp fever, but there is no threat to the horseracing industry.
ANORTH East horse yard sealed off following an autumn swamp fever alert three months ago has been given the all clear and re-opened.
Equine Infectious Anaemia (EIA) or swamp fever, which has never been recorded in Ireland before, has already killed two horses on a stud farm in Co Meath.
The men, from the UK, US and Nigeria, at first feared they'd contracted a local swamp fever.
A Coggins test is done to determine if your horse has Equine Infectious Anemia, more commonly called Swamp Fever.
BETFAIR yesterday revealed their integrity staff are monitoring social networking websites as part of policing betting activity in the wake of the suggestion on Twitter last Wednesday that Danedream could run in the Arc despite an outbreak of swamp fever at her Cologne training centre, writes Graham Green.
GOVERNMENT vets have stepped up checks on possible swamp fever links with Romania and Italy in the wake of three suspected outbreaks in the UK - including one at a Northumberland horse-yard.
And then, whenever our pioneering forefathers found themselves growing accustomed to, and even comfortable with, our miserable climate, they set sail to explore somewhere even more awful where they would almost certainly die of heat exhaustion and swamp fever up a jungle river or freeze to death on the frozen Arctic wastes.