swamper

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swamper

[′swäm·pər]
(mining engineering)
A rear brakeman in a metal mine.
A laborer who assists in hauling ore and rock, coupling and uncoupling cars, throwing switches, and loading and unloading carriers.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rick Hall (El Presidente) along with a group of musicians called the Swampers and a sterling cast of soul legends like Aretha Franklin, Otis Redding, Wilson Picket, Percy Sledge, Etta James and The Staples Singers to casually name a few.
"To work with world-class musicians like Crash Hamilton and the Swampers was a professional highlight."
The list of artists that the Swampers backed reads like a Who's Who of the industry: Rod Stewart, Aretha Franklin, Bob Seger, Cher, Paul Simon, Percy Sledge and many others.
Each of the players in the conflict is interviewed individually, and all the old grievances are aired until finally, at the end, the Swampers are back in the studio, with Rick Hall at the board, cutting a session with Alicia Keys that becomes a ceremony of healing.
One of those bands was The Swampers, whose members later opened the rival Sound Studio.
I get that owning a monster truck with a six-inch lift and 40-inch swampers is required to host a TV show, but do you really have to cover every inch of it with stickers to tell the world that hunting is your passion?
Hall's early successes were recordings made using a rhythm section that would soon become famous, The Swampers. This rhythm section is the one referred to in a line of the well-known song Sweet Home Alabama.
This method doesn't pose a problem in water less than 20 feet deep, but holding blocks in depths deeper than that can be a daunting task--unless you're Captain Brian Rhodes, founder of The Swampers, an outfitting service in Rhode Island.
Some guides start their training as "swampers," or extra crew members, learning the job tasks while they help more experienced guides.
They were swampers, gaunt, malaria-ridden men appearing from nowhere, who ran trap-lines for coons or perhaps farmed little patches of cotton and corn along the edge of the bottom, in clothes but little better than Sam Fathers" (163).
Very clearly, they are not the same kind of white men as the "swampers" who show up in "The Bear," the "gaunt malaria-ridden men ...