swarm


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swarm

1. a group of social insects, esp bees led by a queen, that has left the parent hive in order to start a new colony
2. a large mass of small animals, esp insects

swarm

All the users connected to a single torrent. See BitTorrent.
References in classic literature ?
The little swarm shivered as they watched the dwarf drone-grubs squirm feebly on the grass.
As frame after frame followed it, the swarm beheld the upheaval, exposure, and destruction of all that had been well or ill done in every cranny of their Hive for generations past.
At that the Pool became a scene of mad confusion, fighting, and collision, and for some time a multitude of boats and barges jammed in the northern arch of the Tower Bridge, and the sailors and lightermen had to fight savagely against the people who swarmed upon them from the riverfront.
The prince's court, too, with its swarm of noble barons and wealthy knights, many of whom, in imitation of their master, had brought their ladies and their children from England, all helped to swell the coffers of the burghers.
Two-score archers stood about the gateway, and beat back from time to time with their bow-staves the inquisitive and chattering crowd who swarmed round the portal.
THEY swarmed up towards Sherburn's house, a- whooping and raging like Injuns, and everything had to clear the way or get run over and tromped to mush, and it was awful to see.
The swarm of Bronnitskis and Wintzingerodes and their like still further embittered the relations between the commanders in chief, and even less unity resulted.
In a little narrow street, crowded with our pack-mules and with a swarm of uncouth Arabs, we alighted, and through a kind of a hole in the wall entered the hotel.
The little lives that swarmed beneath the moon, I cannot count them.
As the craft neared the building, and just before she struck, the Martian warriors swarmed upon her from the windows, and with their great spears eased the shock of the collision, and in a few moments they had thrown out grappling hooks and the big boat was being hauled to ground by their fellows below.
We swarmed out of our holes, examining the marks his claws had made on the crumbling rock of the bluff, all of us talking at once.
The poisonous flies and gnats swarmed around by thousands; in vain one waved myrtle-branches about like mad; the audacious insect population did not cease to sting; nor was there a single person in the well-crammed carriage whose face was not swollen and sore from their ravenous bites.