sweet sorghum


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sweet sorghum

[‚swēt ′sȯr·gəm]
(agriculture)
Sorghum bicolor. A crop plant grown primarily for syrup production and for forage.
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In breeding of sweet sorghum. Sweet sorghum was first introduced into the United States in 1852.
However, there is little information on ACE-inhibitory peptides of sweet sorghum grain protein (SSGP) until now.
Sweet sorghum and sugarcanes may vary in respect of high levels of sucrose in their stems.
Sweet sorghum is harvested about two weeks after the milk stage; grain sorghum and broom corn are harvested later, after the seeds are fully mature, with hard glossy seed coats.
ARS scientists are finding value-added uses for other sugar crops, such as sweet sorghum, a crop that has characteristics similar to sugarcane but has different chemical properties, Lima says.
Wortmann, "Sweet sorghum as a bioenergy crop: literature review," Biomass & Bioenergy, vol.
[10.] Zhang SJ, Chaudhry AS, Osman A, et al Associative effects of ensiling mixtures of sweet sorghum and alfalfa on nutritive value, fermentation and methane characteristics.
[23.] Ratnavathi C, Kumar S, Krishna D and J Patil Effect of planting date on cane yield and quality characters in sweet sorghum. J.
Sweet sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) is gaining prominence in many countries as an alternative for biofuel production (Godsey et al., 2012) due to its high production of lignocellulosic biomass and fermentable sugars (Whitfield et al., 2012).
During World War II, there was sugar rationing and many of the farmers grew sweet sorghum to supplement the family's shortage of sugar.
It is necessary to determine stage of harvesting sweet sorghum for kernel, fodder, and biofuel production [5].