sweetgum


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Related to sweetgum: Blackgum

sweetgum

[′swēt‚gəm]
(botany)
Liquidambar styraciflua. A deciduous tree of the order Hamamelidales found in the southeastern United States, and distinguished by its five-lobed, or star-shaped, leaves, and by the corky ridges developed on the twigs.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sweetgum is considered moderately wind resistant, but being multileader, is usually less wind resistant.
The sweetgum trees grew faster for the first few years, with most of the growth occurring in the roots, which enhanced the plants' access to nutrients in the soil.
We defined bottomland hardwood forests as a deciduous hardwood forest in lowland floodplains along larger rivers and lakes, characterized by sweetgum, oaks, tupelo, and baldcypress (Fredrickson, 2005).
palustris), and sweetgum that establish naturally get bulldozed.
In the 1930s Claire Karssiens spent six years of her early girlhood in a tiny Florida backwater called Sweetgum Slough.
Nest Dimensions Substrate Height Length Width Depth (cm) (m) (cm) (cm) Sweetgum * 1.2 12 10 10 Sweetgum 1.9 11 8 10 Sweetgum 1.1 14 9 12 Devil's Walking Stick (Ligustrum 1.4 10 9 8 japonicum) Privet (Ligustrum japonicum) 0.9 15 13 13 Loblolly Pine Sapling 1.3 10 9 9 Greenbrier 0.8 18 9 8 Greenbrier 0.6 11 8 13 Greenbrier * 2.1 15 8 11 Greenbrier Yaupon * 0.8 13 8 13 (Ilex vomitoria) 1.4 18 12 13 * Active nests discovered, but not documented through radiotelemetry.
Subsequent pair-wise nonparametric comparisons for each species revealed that geographic differences were evident for black, bur, and chestnut oak, as well as red pine, sycamore, and sweetgum. Ratings of deer preference were lower in northern Indiana for all of these species (Fig.
Oyster mushrooms have three 21-day growth cycles, and the monks are also attempting to grow shiitake spores in sweetgum logs.
For example, a native tree such as the sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) commonly grows in moist woodlands in all five boroughs and ranges south to Guatemala.
Sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) is considered a Southern species, but the tree actually grows from Connecticut west to Illinois and Missouri, and south from the East Coast to the Gulf of Mexico.
Chemistry professor Thomas Poon of Claremont McKenna College has extracted the acid from the seeds of sweetgum trees, while Canada-based Biolyse Pharma found a source in the needles of discarded pine, fir, and spruce Christmas trees.