swept wing


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Related to swept wing: Forward swept wing

swept wing

[′swept ‚wiŋ]
(aerospace engineering)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The dynamic responses of a swept wing and a curved wing were studied and compared.
Additional advances in engine design in Germany resulted in the fielding of the Me-262 Swallow fighter, which, although not as maneuverable as the American P-51 Mustang or other Allied fighters, had a top speed 100 mph faster, due to its jet engines and swept wings, giving it significant operational advantages.
But now, after half a century of stability, signs are finally emerging that airliners are breaking the mould, moving away from the standard configuration of swept wings and podded engines.
While the swept wing has numerous aerodynamic advantages for high-speed flight, it is characterized by very poor stall characteristics.
The FJ-3 kept the swept wing of its predecessor but incorporated a more powerful engine.
The rocket engines were by no means the only unusual feature of the XF--91: Its 35-degree swept wing could be adjusted to vary the incidence to the most effective angle for takeoff, landing, or cruise.
Its design features swept wings, a streamlined fuselage and tricycle landing gear with a steerable nose wheel.
He worked on the A4 (V-2) missile and its many potential derivatives, including a long range configuration with swept wings.
From swept wings to afterburning turbojet engines, and "Coke-bottle" fuselages to high-altitude pressure suits, aviation progress has always been measured with breakthrough advances in the technology of flight.