otitis externa

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otitis externa

[ō′tīd·əs ek′stər·nə]
(medicine)
Inflammation of the external ear.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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"Redness in the outer ear along with some pain, tenderness, and a feeling of fullness, itchiness, and irritation, can all be symptoms of swimmer's ear. Patients with swimmer's ear may also experience swelling in the outer ear and lymph nodes, loss of appetite, and have problems sleeping.
A Swimmer's ear, or otitis externa, is a bacterial infection of the skin lining the ear canal.
Swimmer's ear is a bacterial infection caused by a build-up of moisture in the ear canal.
But swimmer's ear happens when bacteria grow in the ear canal, which is a passageway to the eardrum.
Swimmer's ear -- also called otitis externa -- is different from a regular ear infection.
Swimmer's ear caused an estimated 2.4 million trips to physician offices and emergency departments in 2007 and cost nearly $500 million to treat, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported May 19.
A CDC study is the first to look at the national costs associated with swimmer's ear, a common condition in which pathogens proliferate in a moist environment in the ear canal (MMWR 2011:60:605-9).
This year's observance focuses on preventing swimmer's ear (acute otitis externa), a common and painful infection of the outer ear canal that results in 2.4 million healthcare visits and nearly half a billion dollars in health-care costs every year (1).
But in the summer, especially, the ear pain may signal otitis externa, more commonly known as swimmer's ear. Acute otitis externa (AOE) is, as the name implies, an infection of the outer ear canal.