switching theory

switching theory

[′swich·iŋ ‚thē·ə·rē]
(electronics)
The theory of circuits made up of ideal digital devices; included are the theory of circuits and networks for telephone switching, digital computing, digital control, and data processing.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Selective harmonic elimination PWM (SHE-PWM) technique is a modulation based on fundamental frequency switching theory proposed in 1974, which aims at eliminating defined harmonic content orders.
The prehistory of cybernetics that results in the problematic history of the development of digital logic, including Boolean algebra, gates that process logic signals, switching theory, flip-flops and memory elements that store logic signals and in general the representation of binary information in physical systems.
It is an analysis that goes beyond acceleration to understand why cybernetic systems are temporally grounded in digital logic and its application to electrical engineering (so-called switching theory), which has become the engine of new varieties of cybernetic capitalism where the logic of capital accumulation is facilitated by cybernetic systems.
Leonard Kleinrock of MIT published the first paper on packet switching theory in July 1961 [5].
Due to Kleinrock's early development of packet switching theory and his focus on analysis, design, and measurement, his Network Measurement Center at UCLA was selected as the first node on the ARPANET.
Its intellectual substance goes well beyond the mathematics of numerical analysis, switching theory, computability theory, and programming languages [2].