syconium


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syconium

[sī′kō·nē·əm]
(botany)
A fleshy fruit, as a fig, with an enlarged pulpy receptacle internally lined with minute flowers.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Consequently, the number of females produced by foundress when two foundresses oviposited in a syconium dropped 60% while that of the males dropped 77% (Table 7).
tonduzi in tree number one: There where no differences in the number of males produced by foundress, when one or two foundresses oviposited in a syconium (Table 8).
in fig wasps that colonize one-foundress brood syconia, as the two species studied, the most female biased sex ratio is achieved when only one foundress colonizes a syconium (West & Herre 1998), and when her larvae are not subject to kleptoparasitism or other kinds of parasitism, (cf.
(in press), and 2) the number of foundresses (density) simultaneously ovipositing in a syconium. Contrary to Moore et al.
Total males, females, and seeds per syconium: The results obtained for the mean number of males and females produced by foundress of P.
Additionally, each foundress carries a total number of eggs that do not exceed the number of flowers available for oviposition in a syconium (Ramirez-Benavides, pers.
In our case, there was an additive effect between the number of foundresses ovipositing in a syconium and the total number of males produced in a brood, as noted by Frank (1983a) for two Floridan Pegoscapus species, for P.
(1996), who noted that "the number of foundresses (foundress density) that enter a syconium to oviposit have a large effect on the average number of offspring (clutch size) produced per foundress" (Herre 1989, Bronstein 1994, Jousselin et al.
(2005), independently of the clutch size of each foundress or knowledge of other foundresses ovipositing into a syconium, as one of possible mechanisms that would allow approximately optimal behavior in the oviposition strategy, as noted by Neft (1989) and Kathuria et al.
in our case, we demostrated statistically that two neotropical Pegoscapus species in Costa Rica do not modify their sex ratio by laying more male eggs when more than one foundress enter and oviposit in a syconium; thus, they do not seem to "count and decide".
The females probably oviposit the male eggs first in the sequence in the most accessible potentially galling flowers; that is, those in the most interior ovary layer inside the syconium, which probably also have the shorter styles and more accessible ovaries (cf.