symbiotic star

symbiotic star

(sim-bÿ-ot -ik, -bee-) A variable ‘star’ whose spectrum shows lines characteristic of gases at two very different temperatures, typically of an M star (3500 K) and a B star (20 000 K) superimposed. It is in fact a semidetached close binary star: a red giant component produces the low-temperature spectrum whereas the higher-temperature spectrum comes from gas streams that are falling on to a companion star, usually a white dwarf or a main-sequence star, but sometimes possibly a neutron star. The mass loss is due to the giant's stellar wind, and so is much slower than the gravitational transfer in the otherwise-similar recurrent novae. Symbiotic stars suffer smaller and more irregular outbursts than other cataclysmic variables. An outburst in the R Aquarii system has produced a narrow jet some 1500 AU in length, visible to optical and radio telescopes. The gas in the jet is traveling at 2000 km s–1, and is apparently a milder version of the ejection found in SS433. Some other well-studied symbiotic stars are Z Andromedae, BF Cygni, RW Hydrae, AG Pegasi, and AX Persei.

symbiotic star

[‚sim·bē′äd·ik ′stär]
(astronomy)
A stellar object whose optical spectrum displays features indicative of two very different stellar regimes: a stellar spectrum whose flux distribution and absorption lines suggest the presence of a cool star, and emission lines which can be formed only in a much hotter medium.
References in periodicals archive ?
Minimum of the lightcurve of the classical symbiotic star AS 338 in 1999', Astronomy letters 27, 1, 51-57, 2001
Symbiotic stars are widely separated, long orbital period interacting binary stars consisting of a late-type giant star and a hot compact companion, usually a white dwarf.
This model for He 2-104 is neither that of a symbiotic star nor that of a planetary nebula," they say.
Astronomers picture symbiotic stars as binary systems in which interactions between a cool red giant and a small, not star excite gas to produce light of particular wavelengths.
2010 was another successful year for the Bronberg Observatory with 17 SN finds, a successful continuation of the faint CV and symbiotic star observing programmes and a valued participation in the microlens follow-up network.
This project has continued to produce interesting information on the select group of symbiotic stars.
2009 was another successful year for the Bronberg Observatory with 18 SN finds, a successful continuation of the faint CV and symbiotic star observing programmes and a valued participation in the microlens follow-up network.
2008 was another successful year for the Bronberg Observatory with 12 SN finds, a successful continuation of the faint CV and symbiotic star observing programmes and a valued participation in the microlens follow-up network.
2007 was another successful year for the Bronberg Observatory with 10 SN finds, a successful continuation of the symbiotic star observing programme and a more streamlined observing plan for CVs.
For all the different types of compact binary stars--cataclysmic variable, symbiotic stars, X-ray binaries, and binary pulsars to name a few--the evolution of all of them is driven by the common mechanism of angular momentum loss.
Abstract: Symbiotic stars are interacting binaries in which the first-formed white dwarf accretes and burns material from a red giant companion.
Abstract: Symbiotic stars are known to be strongly interacting long period binary systems at the final stages of the stellar evolution which can be very useful tool to understand of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and formation of the stellar populations.