sympathy

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sympathy

1. the condition of a physical system or body when its behaviour is similar or corresponds to that of a different system that influences it, such as the vibration of sympathetic strings
2. Physiol the mutual relationship between two organs or parts whereby a change in one has an effect on the other
References in periodicals archive ?
Currently, 79 per cent of Republicans say they sympathise more with Israel than the Palestinians, compared with just 27 per cent of Democrats.
I have to sympathise with his wife - he shows her no respect Emma bond yesterday in shrewsbury, shrops
We must clearly sympathise with those MPs representing the Labour Party who are prepared to put self interest first and foremost, and who are prepared to sacrifice both their party and the needs of the country who demand a credible Opposition Labour Party, and who have demonstrated their willingness to be party to deceit and an attempted Regime Change.
FORMER US president Bill FORMER US president Bill Clinton has urged Scots to vote Clinton has urged Scots to vote to stay in the Union - although to stay in the Union - although he says he sympathises with he says he sympathises with those voting for independence.
And I regret it because I sympathise with the people who are animal activists.
I SYMPATHISE with Nicola Porter, the mum who feels compelled to keep her young son from school because he was punished for misbehaving (Luis, 6, kept home in kebab row, ECHO September 23).
I do not sympathise at all with Lisa in not acquiring a skill which would enable her to apply for the small minority of jobs which require Welsh as a qualification.
There appears to be disproportionate targeting of the route to Holyhead compared to other UK ports and I sympathise with the port.
The source said: "The kidnappers sympathise with the families of the captives but they also call on them to sympathise with the families of the man imprisoned by coalition forces.
One can sympathise with the police who face a hopeless task, but let us not sympathise with rotten local and national politicians and a legal system that sent Tony Martin to prison and plans to reward his criminal attackers.
But not half as much as I sympathise with the thousands of other people whom the law puts out to grass at 65 - no matter how fit, keen or able they are - and who cannot look forward to Brian Mosley*s inevitable lucrative offers for books, shows and live appearances.
I SYMPATHISE with council officials who delude themselves with the belief that an ill-thoughtout prophylactic will have any impact on any aspect of cold calling.