sympatric speciation


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sympatric speciation

[sim¦pa·trik ‚spē·shē′ā·shən]
(evolution)
Speciation that occurs without geographic isolation of a population.
References in periodicals archive ?
Several recent empirical and theoretical studies suggest that sympatric speciation is more common than generally believed (Schluter 1994; Schliewen et al.
This paper proposes a new mechanism driving the initial step toward sympatric speciation through habitat specialization.
Models indicate sympatric speciation is possible for herbivorous insects via a host shift under a restrictive set of conditions.
West-Eberhard 1989; Bush 1994) propose as an initial step in sympatric speciation (i.
Many authors have contended that sympatric speciation requires the partitioning of a limiting resource (Mayr 1970; Tauber and Tauber 1977; Kondrashov and Mina 1986), where this resource is thought of as an ecological factor such as a new host or habitat.
Without such evidence of intralacustrine monophyly, sympatric speciation cannot be strictly claimed (Smith and Todd 1984).
Two speciation modes, that is, speciation via peripheral isolation (or "founder effect"; Mayr 1954) and local sympatric speciation (Bush 1975), can produce a pattern of allele relationships distinguished by all haplotypes of the widespread ("ancestral") species forming a paraphyletic group, whereas alleles of the newly formed ("derived") species arise from within the ancestral species clade [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 1 OMITTED].
Thus Dethier's hypothesis is of particular relevance to theories of sympatric speciation (Mackenzie and Guldemond 1994).
For decades, the consensus has been that sympatric speciation is possible only under such stringent conditions that it is likely to occur very rarely, if at all, in nature (Mayr 1942, 1963; Futuyma and Mayer 1980; Felsenstein 1981).
Mating behavior, polymorphism, reinforcement, reproductive isolation, sympatric speciation, sexual selection.