synchondrosis


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Related to synchondrosis: syndesmosis, synchondrosis costae primae

synchondrosis

[‚sin·kän′drō·səs]
(anatomy)
A type of synarthrosis in which the bone surfaces are connected by cartilage.
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In complete bipartitions, the articulation between the two osseous components is described as a synchondrosis, a syndesmosis or a "combination of both" (O'Neal et al.; Azurza & Sakellariou; Chiodo et al.; Burnett & Case).
Ischiopubic synchondrosis may mimic other pathologies, especially stress fractures, posttraumatic osteolysis, osteomyelitis or bone tumors.
Virchow named the lesion "ecchordosis physaliphora," based on his theory that it was derived from the spheno-occipital synchondrosis. In 1858, Muller theorized the notochordal origin of EP, which was subsequently confirmed in 1894 by Ribbert who coined the definitive term "ecchordosis physaliphora".
Regarding the ossification of chondrocranium (Table 2), in Mabuya species, it starts in stage 39 (D&H); after that, all elements of chondrocranium are ossified and joined by synchondrosis (stage 40 D&H).
The nasopharynx diameter (line N) is measured from the sphenobasioccipital synchondrosis (D') to the posterosuperior part of the hard palate (C') and in practice represents the anteroposterior diameter of the nasopharyngeal space (figure, B).
It is expected, based on normal facial growth directions, that ACM would interrupt or halt normal growth by creating an increase in facial convexity and facial heights by interfering with the growth of the spheno-occipital synchondrosis in the forward and downward directional growth pattern (following Cohen 2006; Enlow and Hans 2008; Moyers and Enlow 1988; Proffett 2007).
Pterygoid processes and synchondrosis spheno-occipital in the Rapid Maxillary Expansion
In this anomaly, the cuneiform bone is divided horizontally by a synchondrosis, partitioning the medial cuneiform into plantar and dorsal segments.
Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) FGFs are a highly conserved family of epithelial signaling factors that are crucial for tooth development, craniofacial patterning, growth regulation, skeleton genesis, and synchondrosis regulation [Nie et al., 2006a].
These are: (1) the Kerckring ossicle (ko), (2) posterior intraoccipital synchondrosis (pio), (3) anterior intraoccipital synchondrosis (aio), (4) sphenooccipital synchondrosis (sos), (5) petrooccipital fissure (pof) and (6) occipitomastoid suture (oms).
The acromial fragment and synchondrosis were easily identified, and the borders of the synchondrosis were hypertrophic.
The talus/os trigonum synchondrosis appeared intact, although subchondral erosions were present along the articular margins (Figure 1).