synchrotron

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synchrotron:

see particle acceleratorparticle accelerator,
apparatus used in nuclear physics to produce beams of energetic charged particles and to direct them against various targets. Such machines, popularly called atom smashers, are needed to observe objects as small as the atomic nucleus in studies of its
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synchrotron

[′siŋ·krə‚trän]
(nucleonics)
A device for accelerating electrons or protons in closed orbits in which the frequency of the accelerating voltage is varied (or held constant in the case of electrons) and the strength of the magnetic field is varied so as to keep the orbit radius constant.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Australian Government, through the National Innovation and Science Agenda, has committed $520 million to the operation of the Australian Synchrotron over the period 2016-2026, a portion of which is contingent on ANSTO securing third party capital investment for new beamlines.
If people had no access to synchrotrons then a lot of science wouldn't be done.
By revealing molecule-size details such as these, synchrotrons have also helped scientists create more-absorbent baby diapers, better packaging for potato chips, and higher-performing jet engines.
A collaboration between five state governments, the Commonwealth and New Zealand Governments, 25 Australian universities, CSIRO, ANSTO and other research institutions, synchrotron should drive Australian innovation for years to come, the Minister for Major Projects, Theo Theophanous, said.
Traditionally, synchrotron light sources use multi-GeV electron beams stored in large rings of magnets to generate intense 1 [Angstrong] wavelength radiation.
However, X-ray spectromicroscopy does require that experiments be conducted in close proximity to a synchrotron.
The synchrotron, which was developed in the United States in 1945, drives charged particles to speeds close to that of light around a circular storage ring through the combination of a high-frequency electric field and a low-frequency magnetic field.
University of Western Ontario (UWO) chemistry professor Michael Bancroft, FCIC, has been using and promoting synchrotrons for research for more than 30 years.
Expert structural biologists have been working for two years to develop plans for the beamlines generated by Argonne's Advanced Photon Source, a synchrotron that produces some of the nation's most brilliant x-rays for research.
This will ensure continual access to the unique properties of the Synchrotrons light beams, as researchers will be able to reveal in exquisite detail the innermost structures of a range of materials.