syndesmosis

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syndesmosis

[‚sin‚dez′mō·səs]
(anatomy)
An articulation in which the bones are joined by collagen fibers.
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Stability in the distal tibiofibular joint is maintained by the syndesmotic ligaments, which include the anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITFL), the posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (PITFL), the transverse ligament, and the interosseous ligament.
Ankle fractures are one of the most common injuries treated operatively by orthopedic surgeons.[1],[2] Pronation-external rotation (PER) injuries or Weber C type fractures, especially PER-4 fractures, are unstable ankle fractures that are associated with the incidence of a complete rupture of the syndesmosis at the distal tibiofibular joint.[3],[4],[5] It is generally agreed that these injuries benefit from obtaining and maintaining an anatomically stable fixation, including the syndesmotic fixation.[6]
In this study, cortical screws frequently used in syndesmotic injuries (with diameters of 3.5 mm and 4.5 mm, in lengths of 45 mm and 65 mm) were designed three-dimensionally using the Solidworks program.
Radiologically, tibiofibular clear space of more than 6 mm and widening of the medial clear space of more than 4 mm indicate syndesmotic instability.
Correlation between radiological assessment of acute ankle fractures and syndesmotic injury on MRI.
In contrast to those results, a previous study on patients with tibial fractures found that a delayed diagnosis was associated with a Maison-neuve, syndesmotic, or posterior or medial malleolar fracture at a rate of 20.1% [10].
Anterior drawer test, Kleiger's test and Syndesmotic testing was negative.
They did find, however, that MRI was useful in confirming or ruling out pathologies not related to syndesmotic ligament impingement.
That will tell you whether there is syndesmotic injury.
Its most distinctive and clinically important characteristic is its dependence on syndesmotic arthrodesis to provide support and surface area for fixation of the tibial component.
Displaced bimalleoler or trimalleolar fractures, talar shift and syndesmotic widening are indications for operative fixation (See Case study 1).
The fibula was reduced in an open fashion but noted to be unstable due to syndesmotic ligament disruption.