Synesthesia

(redirected from synesthete)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

synesthesia

[‚sin·əs′thēzh·ə]
(psychology)
The condition in which a sensory experience normally associated with one sensory system occurs when another sensory system is stimulated.

Synesthesia

 

a phenomenon of perception, in which the impression corresponding to a given stimulus and specific to a given sensory organ is accompanied by an additional sensation or image, often one characteristic of another sensory mode. Typical examples of synesthesia are “color hearing” and aural experiences upon perceiving color. Synesthesia in no way indicates a perception disorder; the experience occurs in one form or other and to some degree in almost everybody. The types of synesthesia are differentiated primarily by the nature of the additional sensations that arise: visual (photisms), aural (phon-isms), gustatory, tactile, and so on. Synesthesia may be selective, affecting only individual impressions, or it may affect all sensations in some area.

A characteristic example of synesthesia is the perception of music by certain composers. It was such synesthetic perceptions that led Scriabin to the concept of “synthetic art,” in which musical tonalities would correspond to certain colors, for example, in the symphonic poem Prometheus: the Poem of Fire (1910). Synesthetic experiences are not identical for all people; for example, various color representations may be linked with a single tonality. The phenomenon of synesthesia is found in the “colored” experience of numbers, days of the week, and so on. There is no satisfactory theory of synesthesia.

REFERENCES

Titchener, E. B. Uchebnik psikhologii, part 1. Moscow, 1914. Pages 162–65.
Kravkov, S. V. Vzaimodeistvie organov chuvstv. Moscow-Leningrad, 1948.
Luriia, A. R. Malen’kaia knizhka o bol’shoi pamiati. Moscow, 1968. Pages 15–19.
Velichkovskii, B. M., V. P. Zinchenko, and A. R. Luriia. Psikhologiia vospriiatiia. Moscow, 1973. Pages 54–58.

A. A. PUZYREI

References in periodicals archive ?
In neurological terms, synesthesia is due to cross-wiring in the brain of some people (synesthetes); in other words, synesthetes present more synaptic connections than "normal" people.
While most synesthetes have been so since childhood, it is possible to develop synesthesia later in life, and some who have suffered trauma or have had a near-death experience have found themselves experiencing this conjoining of sensations as a result.
Reading a Southern gothic rift on A Midsummer Night's Dream through a third person omniscient lens (of a synesthete child and his synesthetic family) clearly provides opportunities for moments of startling epiphanies and stunning descriptions.
In basic neurological terms, synesthesia is thought to be due to cross-wiring in the brain of some people (synesthetes); in other words, synesthetes present more synaptic connections than "normal" people.
Dr Goodhew said synesthetes have stronger connections between different brain areas, particularly between what we think of as the language part of the brain and the color part of the brain.
Synesthetes are people who associate with one kind of sensory impression when a different sense is stimulated.
This volume brings together a distinguished group of investigators from diverse backgrounds--among them neuroscientists, novelists, and synesthetes themselves--who provide fascinating answers to these questions.
Dr Rothen adds: "It should be emphasized that we are not claiming to have trained non-synesthetes to become genuine synesthetes.