synkinesia

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synkinesia

[¦sin‚kī¦nē·zhə]
(physiology)
Involuntary movement coincident with purposeful movements carried out by a distant part of the body, such as swinging the arms while walking. Also known as accessory movement; associated automatic movement.
References in periodicals archive ?
Facial biofeedback training in front of a mirror (mime therapy) and electromyographic biofeedback training are successful in preventing synkinesis. [10] The present case was managed with electrotherapy, massage, and exercise after which he gained an improvement of one grade regarding the House-Brackmann scale on both sides.
Unilateral or bilateral laryngeal synkinesis would probably end any professional singing career, but it is worthy of discussion for completeness of this topic.
Selective reinnervation of the midfacial branches (zygomatic or buccal) can result in strong smile recovery with minimal risk of facial synkinesis.
Prognostic factors of synkinesis after Bell's palsy and Ramsay Hunt syndrome.
Facial synkinesis is the involuntary movement of one set of muscles when the patient tries to move another set of muscles.
Grade II Slight weakness noticeable only on close inspection Complete eye closure with minimal effortSlight asymmetry of smile with maximal effort Synkinesis barely noticeable, contracture, or spasm absent
On the 30th day, the magnesium and vitamin B6 supplement was associated with improved behavior, decreased anxiety and aggression, improvement in both large- and small-scale mobility, decreased synkinesis, and increased attention.
The following neuropsychological features that characterize the functions of both the left and right subcortical-frontal regions were studied: dynamic activity parameters (freezing, impulsiveness, inertia, slowness) and parameters of the regulation of fine motor action (tremor, synkinesis, propulsion).
Incomplete recovery is also associated with facial synkinesis due to giant motor unit development when intact nerve fibers predominate over adjacent muscle fibers whose nerve innervation has had incomplete recovery.
Typical features of Kallmann syndrome include anosmia, infertility, synkinesis, and hypodontia.
Early use of corticosteroid therapy results in less autonomic synkinesis and possibly improved rates of recovery in adults (strength of recommendation: C); there is no proven benefit in children (SOR: B).