synoptic chart

synoptic chart

[sə′näp·tik ′chärt]
(meteorology)
Any chart or map on which data and analyses are presented that describe the state of the atmosphere over a large area at a given moment in time.

synoptic chart

A standardized map of the weather that shows the distribution of meteorological conditions over any area at a given time. A synoptic chart shows isobars, fronts, and weather symbols. These normally are drawn at three hourly intervals, usually at 000, 0300, 0600, 0900, 1200, 1500, 1800, and 2100 h GMT (Greenwich mean time). Also called a surface analysis chart.
References in periodicals archive ?
Peter Moore's text, The Weather Experiment, takes the reader back to another time--long before the clouds had scientific names or a single synoptic chart had been plotted.
A marked feature on the synoptic chart earlier this week was the rather slow progression of the South Atlantic High.
I passionately believe in learning outside the classroom--whether that is creating a human synoptic chart or earthquake wave in the corridor or climbing the volcanic hills of Iceland,' she said.
Also particularly helpful are a synoptic chart comparing the overlap between MS A and B (pp.
Undercutting and overriding of airmasses and their intertwining flows will ensure vortex development identifiable for each successive 3-hourly synoptic chart.
Quite naturally the full range of detail is expansive: and that is just the one synoptic chart.
The synoptic chart shows that an intense anticyclone has been present over the mid-Atlantic for the past week.
He also pioneered techniques for forecasting weather such as synoptic charts, where weather observations taken at the same time were drawn on a map to aid forecasting - a technique still used today.
We obtained the synoptic charts for 00 and 12 Greenwich mean time covering the period 1983-1995 on a daily basis from the archives of the European Meteorological Bulletin.
The text is enhanced by three important factors: the generous citation of sources, the use of synoptic charts, and clear outlines of the various rites.
The Bergen weather bureau associates most of the phenomena of cyclones with different parts of the polar front, and in particular on all synoptic charts set out definite rain areas in connection with the two surfaces which meet in the cyclonic center.
The most noticeable feature of the week's progression of synoptic charts is that the core of the high pressure cells in the so-called subtropical high pressure belt, has shifted south by about one thousand kilometres.