syntactic


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to syntactic: syntactic error, Syntactic foam

syntactic

Dealing with language rules (syntax). See syntax.
References in periodicals archive ?
This study investigates the extent to which the syntactic and semantic characteristics of these of-dependents influence and determine the patterns of verbal agreement of twenty-three collective noun-based constructions.
Trelleborg's applied technologies operation, a part of the Trelleborg Offshore & Construction business area, manufactures and designs polymer and syntactic material solutions for a wide range of industries including aerospace, screen printing, rail and motor sport.
Mensah, Compression Properties of Syntactic Foams: Effect of Cenosphere Radius Ratio and Specimen Aspect Ratio, Compos.
The Study of Morphological, Syntactic, and Semantic Errors Made by Native Speakers of Persian and English Children Learning English"
While measuring the influence of different plug-assist materials, CMT scientists found "statistically significant improvements" in haze, material distribution and crush strength for thermoformed PP parts which utilised syntactic foam plug assists.
Epoxy resin, a class of thermosetting polymers, is a popular matrix material in syntactic foam.
The German suffixes attach as syntactic heads, while the Russian ones attach as syntactic modifiers.
The remaining English idioms are translated following different syntactic structure patterns, the most prevalent of which is N+N, where the first noun is used in the Genitive case.
The classification of syntactic constructions is based both on semantic and syntactic criteria.
In addition, by two years of age they can exploit function words to infer the syntactic category of unknown content words (nouns vs verbs) and guess their plausible meaning (object vs action).
Written varieties of many languages show greater syntactic complexity than their spoken counterparts.
SUMMARY: Stainton argues (2006, 2001) that since sub-sentential speech acts lack the proper syntactic structure to have logical form, it is not from them that subsententially propositions conveyed derive their logical form, in this brief comment, I develop an argument for the claim that sub-sentential speech acts not only do have the proper syntactic structure, but that according to Stainton's own general pragmatic account of sub-sentential speech, they also satisfy all the criteria put forward by him to be the primary bearers of logical form.