systematic error


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Related to systematic error: Parallax error

systematic error

[‚sis·tə′mad·ik ′er·ər]
(engineering)
An error due to some known physical law by which it might be predicted; these errors produced by the same cause affect the mean in the same sense, and do not tend to balance each other but rather give a definite bias to the mean.
(statistics)
An error which results from some bias in the measurement process and is not due to chance, in contrast to random error.
References in periodicals archive ?
Figure 5 presents an exemplary relationship between the mean absolute systematic error of the IpDFT methods (and the AS algorithm combined) and the frequency correction factor and the modulation index for the case without spectral lines overlapping.
When the systematic error terms are removed and disregarded by using this equation, different MPs provide different results for the same CS even if replication is used to reduce random error.
The systematic errors caused by the inaccuracy of the mathematical model of the emulsion were determined earlier.
The proposed solutions-consist of compensating the systematic errors of low-cost inertial using Powell's Dog Leg algorithm; augmenting the navigation solution with combined GPS and INS using EKF; and exploiting the inertial sensor to estimate the dynamics of vehicle to extract the accident.
Positional accuracy can be affected by random or systematic errors or gross errors also known as blunders.
After removing of systematic errors (2nd degree polynomial typical curve), the standard deviation reached 2.12", therefore in this case it is possible to increase the accuracy of measurements by 0.
Effects of systematic error correction and repeated reading on the reading accuracy and proficiency of second graders with disabilities.
Table 1 indicates that systematic errors are relatively small (less than 1.3 mm) in short distance measurements.
The two types of error are 1) systematic errors and 2) increased random errors.
He covers disease causality, epidemiologic measures, random and systematic error in studies of casual factors, the infectious disease process, outbreak investigation, screening for disease, and advanced biostatistical and epidemiologic techniques, such as survival analysis, Mantel-Haenszel techniques, and tests for interaction.
Effect of systematic errors.--In Figure 7A, the mean value recovery differences over all logs are plotted against the tested levels of a systematic error in knot diameter (explicit numbers given in Table A3).
Two advantages claimed for the view are its capacity to make sense of systematic error in speakers' use of their words, and its capacity to distinguish between verbal and substantive disagreements.

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