systematic sampling


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systematic sampling

[‚sis·tə′mad·ik ′sam·pliŋ]
(mining engineering)
Extracting samples at evenly spaced periods or in fixed quantities from a unit of coal.
References in periodicals archive ?
Systematic sampling can obtain more reliable deforestation results than random sampling, which also depends on the sample locations.
If instead Y is a bounded convex spatial set containing O, the volume and the surface area of Y may be estimated by a two-step procedure which involves circular systematic sampling in a section through O and the use of the cubed radial function or the squared support function (Gundersen, 988; Cruz-Orive, 2005).
While systematic sampling may seem convenient, it can pose problems when there is a systematic pattern associated with how the data were sorted.
The program calls for systematic sampling of meat cuts at the retail level and comparing the DNA with that of source animals.
Such systematic sampling over three years therefore yielded many new species to the UAE, including some new to science.
Systematic sampling, or grid sampling, ensures that the entire site is represented by individual samples.
The most common probability sampling methods in auditing are equal probability (such as simple random and systematic sampling) and sampling with probability proportional to size (such as monetary unit sampling).
The second involved systematic sampling to establish As residue patterns surrounding a range of dip sites.
(54.) A systematic sampling technique was employed to select 10 percent of delinquency cases petitioned to the Los Angeles County Juvenile Court by the LAPD in 1940 (cases petitioned by other agencies, such as the county sheriff's office or probation department, were excluded, as were dependency cases--LAPD-initiated cases involving neglect and abuse).
Initially, through systematic sampling on a square grid, a set of 115 sampling points was chosen to measure the variables considered.
Systematic sampling was the most efficient sampling scheme over the observed range of occupancy rates (Table 2) because fewer boxes would be required to achieve desired levels of precision compared to stratified random sampling.
Many ecologists use two-dimensional systematic sampling to estimate mean density of individuals over the domain sampled.

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