systematic

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systematic

Biology of or relating to the taxonomic classification of organisms
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This again suggests that the discriminant analysis identifies and distinguishes the species using aspects of their form different than those previously used by systematists. Although differences in EFDs themselves cannot be "translated" into morphologic features, it may be possible to develop keys on the basis of reconstructions such as those in Figure 5.
DPS delineation first became an issue in Pacific salmon, in part because fish systematists have not traditionally recognized subspecies to the extent as have other taxonomists.
The absence of corneal lenses on these bidessine larvae presents systematists with an additional source of stemmatal variation that may be evaluated objectively with no more difficulty than assessments of cranial sensilla.
Lichenizing fungi typically don't have a lot of fancy morphology like flowers or bones that systematists can use for classification.
Even those who are systematists usually specialize in no more than a few families within an order.
Polyploidy via genome duplication within one species (autopolyploidy) has typically been considered of little importance evolutionarily, although recent work suggests that plant systematists may be overlooking many species which have arisen through this process (Judd et al.
The international community of taxonomists and systematists are reconstructing the great tree of life.
The work is intended for mammalogists, systematists, ecologists and zoogeographers.
Most systematists who have studied the question--Chapin (1917, 1929, 1954), Sushkin (1927), Delacour (1943), Tordoff (1954), Wolters (1957, 1960), Friedman (1960, 1962), Bentz (1979), Sibley & Ahlquist (1990), Lahti & Payne (2003), and Fry & Keith (2004)--placed the whydahs closer to their hosts, the waxbills, than to any other systematic group.
Systematists in recent years broadly agree on the distinction between primary and secondary homology (e.g., de Pinna 1991).
I may be criticized for saying that some of the controversies of systematists approach the bitterness of political orators.
Many systematists believe that most and perhaps nearly all of the remaining 90 percent can be discovered, diagnosed, and named in as little as one-10th that time--about 25 years.