failure

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Related to systolic heart failure: diastolic heart failure, Systolic blood pressure

failure

[′fāl·yər]
(engineering)
A permanent change in the volume of a powder or the stresses within it.
(mechanics)
Condition caused by collapse, break, or bending, so that a structure or structural element can no longer fulfill its purpose.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Failure

A condition when a structure or material ceases to fulfill its required purpose. The failure of a structural member may be caused by elastic deformation, fracture, or excessive deflection. The nonstructural failure of a material may be due to weathering, abrasion, or chemical action.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Failure

 

Failure is a consequence of a change in the parameters of a device or of its parts, resulting from internal physicochemical processes and the effect of the environment.

A distinction is made between sudden failure and gradual failure. Sudden failure is characterized by an abrupt change in the values of one or more fundamental parameters of a device (for example, the burnout of the incandescent filament in an electric lamp); in gradual failure, there is a slow change in the values of one or more fundamental parameters of a device (for example, the decrease of engine power to a level below the rated power). The criteria for failure are established in the technical specifications for a particular item.

As a result of failure, a device may stop operating completely, or its operating efficiency may fall below the permissible level. Failure of an element in a device that is not caused by damage to other elements is called independent failure; failure resulting from damage or the complete failure of other elements is called dependent failure.

V. N. FOMIN

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

What does it mean when you dream about a failure?

Dreaming about failing, in school or in some task, may simply be an expression of anxiety (i.e., it is not a sign predicting that someone will fail). People who regularly dream of failing are often perfectionists.

The Dream Encyclopedia, Second Edition © 2009 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

failure

In structural engineering, that condition of a structural element (or its material components) which renders it incapable of continuing the load-carrying function for which it was designed; may be caused by fracture or by excessive and permanent plastic deformation.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Failure

Army Bomb Plot
attempted assassination of Hitler; his miraculous escape brought dreadful retaliation (1944). [Ger. Hist.: Van Doren, 500]
Brown, Charlie
comic strip character for whom losing is a way of life. [Comics: “Peanuts” in Horn, 542–543]
Bunion Derby
financially disastrous cross-country marathon. [Am. Hist.: Sann, 48–56]
Carker, John
broken-spirited man occupying subordinate position. [Br. Lit.: Dombey and Son]
Edsel
much bruited automobile fails on market (1950s). [Am. Hist.: Flexner, 78]
English, Julian
contentious and unloved salesman; commits suicide in despair. [Am. Lit.: Appointment in Samarra]
Gunpowder Plot
attempt to blow up the Parliament building; led to the execution of its leader, Guy Fawkes (1605). [Brit. Hist.: EB, IV: 70–71]
Little Tramp Chaplin’s
much-loved, much-imitated hapless, “I’m a failure” persona. [Am. Cinema: Griffith, 79]
Loman, Willy
traveling salesman who gradually comes to realize that his life has been a complete failure; commits suicide. [Am. Lit.: The Death of a Salesman, Payton, 397]
Mighty Casey
ignominiously strikes out in the clutch. [Am. Lit.: “Casey at the Bat” in Turkin, 642]
Reardon, Edwin
very promising writer who, after unsuccessful publication, returns to clerical job. [Br. Lit.: New Grub Street, Magill I, 647–649]
Skid Row
district of down-and-outs and bums. [Am. Usage: Brewer Dictionary, 1008]
WIN buttons
President Ford’s scheme to reduce inflation: for the American public to wear shields stating “WIN.” (Whip Inflation Now). [Am. Hist.: Misc.]
World League
“ingenious” creation of a third professional league that never materialized. [Am. Sports: Misc.]
Yank
steamship stoker vainly tries to climb the social ladder, then fails in attempt to avenge himself on society. [Am. Drama: O’Neill The Hairy Ape in Sobel, 339]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

failure

The inability of a system or system component to perform a required function within specified limits. A failure may be produced when a fault is encountered.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)
References in periodicals archive ?
Echocardiography plays a vital role in the diagnosis of patients with heart failure, in part because the physical examination, electrocardiogram, and chest radiograph do not provide information that distinguishes diastolic from systolic heart failure (28,29).
All patients with systolic heart failure should receive both ACE inhibitors and beta-blockers, unless they have demonstrated an intolerance for the drugs, conclude researchers.
"Beta-blockers have been shown to improve survival, reduce hospitalizations and improve the strength and size of the heart in patients with systolic heart failure. They also make patients feel better," says Cleveland Clinic heart failure specialist Miriam Jacob, MD.
The Cardiovascular Health Study examined LAVi as a predictor of prevalent and incident heart failure and found that control subjects free of cardiovascular disease were less likely to be black and a higher percentage of black patients with prevalent heart failure had systolic heart failure compared to diastolic heart failure [20].
Therapeutic Challenges and Considerations in the Treatment of Systolic Heart Failure. Although it is typically recommended that chemotherapy be discontinued when significant heart failure develops, case reports have shown that sorafenib can be used to treat advanced HCC for as long as 12 months and may be reduced in those that develop heart failure [1].
A/ THREE BETA-BLOCKERS--CARVE DILOL, METOPROLOL SUCCINATE, AND BISOPROLOL--reduce mortality equally (by about 30% over one year) in patients with Class III or IV systolic heart failure. Insufficient evidence exists comparing equipotent doses of these medications head-to-head to recommend any one over the others (strength of recommendation [SOR]: A, systematic review/meta-analysis).
Net proceeds are expected to be used by the company to fund research and development activities of MYDICAR and its companion diagnostic for the treatment of systolic heart failure and other indications, for the development of commercial manufacturing capabilities, working capital as well as general corporate purposes.
Yeh and her associates at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, randomized 100 patients with systolic heart failure to 12 weeks of twice-weekly tai chi classes or twice-weekly education classes.
Statins like rosuvastatin (Crestor) are prescribed to reduce LDL ("bad") cholesterol and reduce cardiovascular risks, but patients with systolic heart failure (HF) have generally been excluded from statin trials.
In men, heart failure is generally the result of damage from a heart attack that prevents the muscle from squeezing forcefully (systolic heart failure).
In contrast, heart failure and a reduced EF have been termed systolic heart failure. Patients with diastolic heart failure are more commonly women, elderly.

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