heart murmur

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heart murmur

[′härt ′mər·mər]
(medicine)
References in periodicals archive ?
Table I shows a breakdown of the three clinical scenarios focused on normal heart sounds, third and fourth heart sound, systolic murmurs (innocent murmur and mitral valve prolapse), and diastolic murmurs (chronic and acute aortic regurgitation).
In addition there was cardiomegaly and a systolic murmur was heard.
Upon evaluation the patient was found with stable vital signs (pulse 100 beats per minute, blood pressure 130/80, respiratory rate 20 per minute, afebrile), jugular venous distention (10 cm above the sternal angle), heart with regular rate and rhythm, systolic murmur III/VI intensity best heard at the left sternal border in the second intercostal space.
Physical examination showed a systolic murmur and an echocardiogram showed aortic stenosis.
She had three palpable occipital lymph nodes, cervical lymphadenopathy, III/VI systolic murmur, two well-healed abdominal scars, a palpable liver 2 cm below the costal margin, and a palpable spleen.
A harsh systolic murmur was heard in the aortic area with a third heart sound.
MVP is also called floppy valve syndrome, Barlow's or Reid-Barlow's syndrome, ballooning mitral valve, midsystolic-click-late systolic murmur syndrome, or click murmur syndrome.
His physical examination revealed radio-femoral delay and systemic hypertension with right upper limb blood pressure of 190/110 mmHg and in in lower limb of 90/50 mmHg along with grade 3/6 ejection systolic murmur over left sternal border.
On auscultation second heart sound was loud in pulmonary area with narrow split, ejection systolic murmur heard in the pulmonary area.
On physical examination his blood pressure was 86/40 mmHg and pulse was 74 beats per minute with a grade 5/6 ejection systolic murmur at the right upper sternal border radiating to carotids.
Clinical and special investigation features of aortic stenosis Aortic stenosis History Exertional dyspnoea Angina Syncope Physical findings Small-volume, slow-rising pulses Narrow pulse pressure JVP normal, unless heart failure or MV disease Pressure-loaded undisplaced apex beat Soft or single second heart sound Crescendo-decrescendo ejection systolic murmur at base of the heart Radiated to carotids Longer murmur = more severe High-pitched widely radiating murmur: Gallavardin effect--can be mistaken for MR Systolic click in bicuspid valve may be heard Special investigations ECG Left ventricular hypertrophy CXR Normal-sized heart (ventricle) Aortic calcification Post-stenotic dilatation: especially in bicuspid valves Table 4.

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