syzygy

(redirected from Syzygium)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to Syzygium: Syzygium jambolanum

syzygy

(sĭz`əjē), in astronomy, alignment of three bodies of the solar system along a straight or nearly straight line. A planet is in syzygy with the earth and sun when it is in oppositionopposition,
in astronomy, alignment of two celestial bodies on opposite sides of the sky as viewed from earth. Opposition of the moon or planets is often determined in reference to the sun.
..... Click the link for more information.
 or conjunctionconjunction,
in astronomy, alignment of two celestial bodies as seen from the earth. Conjunction of the moon and the planets is often determined by reference to the sun.
..... Click the link for more information.
, i.e., when its elongationelongation,
in astronomy, the angular distance between two points in the sky as measured from a third point. The elongation of a planet is usually measured as the angular distance from the sun to the planet as measured from the earth.
..... Click the link for more information.
 is 180° or 0°. The moon is in syzygy with the earth and sun when it is new or full.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

syzygy

(siz -ă-jee) The configuration arising when the Sun, Earth, and either the Moon or a planet lie approximately in line, i.e. when the Moon or planet is at opposition or conjunction.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

Syzygy

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Syzygy traditionally referred to a conjunction of the Sun and the Moon, such as occurs during a solar eclipse. By extension, it is currently applied to the alignment of any three celestial bodies in a straight line (such as occurs during eclipses and occultations). The etymology of the term is as follows: The sy[n], which is related to the prefix of such words as synchronic, means “together;”-zygy derives from the Greek zugón, meaning “yoke,” so syzygy literally means to yoke together. This makes syzygy appear to be a macrocosmic parallel to certain yoga practices in which the internal, symbolic (microcosmic) Sun and Moon are joined together—as in alternate nostril breathing, a technique said to join the Sun (right nostril) and Moon (left nostril) energies. What makes this parallel all the more striking is that both zugón and yoga ultimately derive from the same Indo-European root word yug (yoke).

Sources:

DeVore, Nicholas. Encyclopedia of Astrology. New York: Philosophical Library, 1947.
Gettings, Fred. Dictionary of Astrology. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1985.
The Astrology Book, Second Edition © 2003 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Syzygy

 

a general name for the two phases of the moon—new moon and full moon—when the sun, earth, and moon are positioned along a straight line. This arrangement gives rise to a number of astronomical and geophysical phenomena. For example, eclipses of the sun and moon are observed during syzygy, and it is during syzygy that tides reach their highest point. The term “syzygy” is sometimes used in reference to planets at moments of the planets’ conjunction and opposition with respect to the sun.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

syzygy

[′siz·ə·jē]
(astronomy)
One of the two points in a celestial object's orbit where it is in conjunction with or opposition to the sun.
Those points in the moon's orbit where the moon, earth, and sun are in a straight line.
The alignment of any three objects within the solar system, or within any other system of objects in orbit about a star.
(invertebrate zoology)
End-to-end union of the sporonts of certain gregarine protozoans.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Da Silva Filho et al., "Antimicrobial activity of Syzygium cumini (Myrtaceae) leaves extract," Brazilian Journal of Microbiology, vol.
Jambolan (Syzygium cumini Lam), black nightshade (Solanum nigrum Linn), inga edulis (Inga edulis Mart), and Japanese grape (Hovenia dulcis Thunb) are unexplored fruits and few studies have been published on characterizing the bioactive compounds and antioxidant capacity of the pulps, peels, and seeds of these fruits.
Four species were the most abundant in the community and together they make up a large proportion of the density and basal area (Alstonia congensis, Xylopia rubescens, Hallea stipulosa and Syzygium owariense).
The breeding period was discerned to be start from April to August and Acacia nilotica was observed as most preferred tree for nesting followed by Syzygium cuminii.
As the findings indicated that Syzygium guineense-Galiniera saxiferaga community type exhibited the highest species richness while the highest diversity and evenness were observed for Maesa lanceolata-Allophylus abyssinicus community type.
Caption: Figure 2--Free Radical Scavenging Capacity (RSC) the essential oils from Syzygium aromaticum, Cymbopogon citratus, and Lippia alba, using DPPH methodology.
It was concluded that glucose lowering effect was dose dependent with ethanol extract of Syzygium aromaticum and at higher doses (750 mg/kg) the reduction was more as compared to the reduction in blood glucose brought about by standard insulin.
Popular name Scientific name [IC.sub.50] ([micro]g [mL.sup.-1]) 1 Jambul Syzygium cumini 20.94 (a) [+ or -] 0.56 2 Acerola Malpighia emarginata 24.48 (a) [+ or -] 0.27 3 Star fruit Averrhoa carambola L.