szaibelyite

szaibelyite

[sā′bel‚yīt]
(mineralogy)
(Mn,Mg)(BO2)(OH) A white to buff or straw yellow, orthorhombic mineral consisting of a basic borate of manganese and magnesium; occurs as veinlets, masses, or embedded nodules.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of the commonly used commercial boron derivatives are borax, colemanite, ulexite, kernite, probertite and szaibelyite (Ozkan et al., 1997).
(59.) Gao, R, Liu, Q, Wang, J, Zhang, X, Yang, W, Liu, J, Liu, L, "Fabrication of Fibrous Szaibelyite with Hierarchical Structure Superhydrophobic Coating on AZ31 Magnesium Alloy for Corrosion Protection." Chem.
Zhu, "Hydrothermal formation of the head-to-head coalesced szaibelyite MgB[O.sub.2](OH) nanowires," Nanoscale Research Letters, vol.
(seI) CE acequia (a canal for irrigation), fiance SA sacred, dispensation SAI saint, sailor SE Seder (Passover service), Luiseno (a Shoshone Indian people) shimose (a high explosive), seance SI sind (to rinse), Sinaic SSAY essay(ette) SSEH medresseh (a Muslim college) SZAI szaibelyite (a hydrous borate of magnesium) CEE fiancee SAE saeter (a meadow associated with a dwelling) SAY saying, calisaya (a valuable Peruvian bark), soothsay SEI seigniorial, seine (a fishing net), abseil, nisei \sayyid SEY Seychelles, causey (a dam) SSA decussate, glissade, cessation SSE masse (a billiards term), chausse (shod) SSEI nissei (an American born of Japanese parents) ZE piazze (var.
More than 230 different types of boron minerals are known in nature, but the number having commercial importance is limited to the following: tincal, colemanite, kernite, ulexite, pandermite, boracite, szaibelyite and hydroboracite.
The gangue minerals in the veins are quartz, various carbonates, asbestiform and talcose silicates, and much more rarely pyrophyllite and the finely acicular borate szaibelyite.
Nifontovite is a hydrated calcium borate mineral, [Ca.sub.3][B.sub.6][O.sub.6](OH)[.sub.12]([H.sub.2]O)[.sub.2], first described from the Novofrolovo mine in the Turinsk ore deposit, Central Ural Mountains, Russia (Malinko and Lisitsyn, 1961), where it occurs in a skarn associated with andraditegrossular and szaibelyite.
Other less attractive but interesting species include bismuth minerals (native bismuth, bismuthinite, cosalite, bismutite), tungsten minerals (scheelite, ferberite) and several borates including ludwigite in large, radiated masses, inderite, szaibelyite and canavesite-a species described in 1978 for which Brosso is the type and, so far, only locality.