tacit

(redirected from tacitness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.

tacit

created or having effect by operation of law, rather than by being directly expressed
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Differences in entrepreneurial opportunities: The role of tacitness and codification in opportunity identification.
For an intellectual history of the concept of tacit knowledge in a variety of related academic disciplines, see Robin Cowan et al., The Explicit Economics of Knowledge Codification and Tacitness, 9 INDUS.
Depending on the degree of tacitness of this knowledge, a wide variety of communication measures are generally used to facilitate this transfer, ranging from written documentation to personal trainings and apprenticeship programs (e.g., von Hippel, 1994; Nonaka & Takeuchi, 1995; Lam, 1997).
According to Kotabe, Dunlap-Hinkler, Parente and Mishra (2007), knowledge transferability should be analyzed according to its tacitness, specificity and complexity.
This condition is most satisfied when capabilities develop under unique historical conditions (path dependence), are mutually enforcing when applied (embeddedness), and require socially complex interactions (tacitness) (Dierickx & Cool, 1989; Teece et al., 1997).
For Sveiby (Sveiby, 2000), knowledge characteristics includes tacitness, action oriented, supported by rules and constantly changing.
This strategy, by which gay identity is implied and unspoken, is known as "tacit subjectivity," or "tacitness." The authors of this study postulated that, for gay Latino men, their relationships in the family and Latino community are more important than the acknowledgment of individual difference and the expression of authenticity.
In the Uppsala model the tacitness of internationalization knowledge is predetermined (Petersen, Pedersen, Sharma, 2001).
Knowledge tacitness is context-specific that the licensor is not fully aware of the details of the performance and finds it difficult or impossible to articulate a full account of the details (Nelson and Winter, 1982).
Additionally, the characteristics of the knowledge itself--such as "tacitness" or "causal ambiguity"--are widely recognized barriers to knowledge transfer (Lippman & Rumelt, 1982; Zander & Kogut, 1995).
Jobe (2001), Codification and tacitness as knowledge management strategies: An empirical exploration.