tack


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Related to tack: Horse tack

tack

1
1. a short sharp-pointed nail, usually with a flat and comparatively large head
2. Nautical the heading of a vessel sailing to windward, stated in terms of the side of the sail against which the wind is pressing
3. Nautical
a. a course sailed by a sailing vessel with the wind blowing from forward of the beam
b. one such course or a zigzag pattern of such courses
4. Nautical
a. a sheet for controlling the weather clew of a course
b. the weather clew itself
5. Nautical the forward lower clew of a fore-and-aft sail

tack

2
a. riding harness for horses, such as saddles, bridles, etc.
b. (as modifier): the tack room
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Tack

 

(Russian, gals; from Dutch hals). (1) The course of a vessel with respect to the wind (for example, a vessel is moving on a starboard tack when the wind is blowing toward the starboard side of a vessel).

(2) The segment of a vessel’s course from turn to turn while maneuvering under sail, carrying out measuring operations, sweeping mines, fishing, and so on.

(3) A rope securing the lower windward corner of the sail (the tack corner) to a mast.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

tack

[tak]
(design engineering)
A small, sharp-pointed nail with a broad flat head.
(materials)
Adhesive stickiness, such as occurs on the surface of a varnish or ink that has not completely dried. Also known as tackiness.
(navigation)
To change the course of a sailing vessel by coming about so as to take the wind from over the opposite bow (starboard or port).
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

tack

1. A strip of metal, usually lead or copper, used as a clip to secure the edges of metal items in roof construction, such as flashings.
2. A short, sharp-pointed nail.
3. The property of an adhesive that enables it to form a bond of measurable strength immediately after the adhesive and adherend are brought into contact under low pressure.
4. To glue, weld, or otherwise fasten in spots rather than in a continuous line.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Canfield & Tack was founded in 1926 by Hubert Canfield and Larry Tack as a lithographic printer.
Figure 7 presents the laser scanning confocal microscopic images of stamping samples using adhesives with high tack value (a) and low-tack value (b).
Sonia Kidd, mitigating, said that Tack stole to feed herself and take pictures of her two children who she has limited contact with as they have been taken into care.
Velikay-Parel, "Distribution of glial fibrillary acidic protein accumulation after retinal tack insertion for intraocular fixation of epiretinal implants," Acta Ophthalmologica, vol.
Despite the team's best efforts a few tacks went unnoticed.
"That's what I told Tack, that no one would be here.
Unlike stents, which have to be precisely sized to the artery where they will be placed, the Tack implant adapts to the diameter of the artery.
In addition to offering an unrestricted and inexpensive cloud solution, the Tack App also provides users with the security of knowing their files will not be compromised by being uploaded to cloud servers in some unknown locations.
After towing the vehicle seven miles home to strip for spares he put the "Blu Tack" in his shed.
(NYSE: NQ) said that it has entered into a non-binding memorandum of understanding with Tack Fiori International Group Limited (Stock code: 928.HK).
THE list of National Hunt stallion sons of Monsun in Britain and Ireland has grown again after the acquisition of multiple Listed winner Aizavoski by Arctic Tack Stud in County Wexford.