tackless strip

tackless strip

tackless strip
A metal strip, beneath the edge of carpeting, which is fastened to the floor, to a stair, etc.; the strip has many small hooks which point upward and slightly toward the edge; the carpeting is stretched beyond the metal strip, allowing the hooks to secure the carpet backing and hold the carpeting in place.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this article, we're assuming you have wood or tile floors, but if you have carpeting, you'll need to roll it back, remove the tackless strip, and then stretch and trim it later.
Nail down the tackless strip (Photo 2), fingertip width (1/4 to 3/8 in.
then use the tackless strip as a guide to cut the pad to fit lengthwise (Photo 4).
Press hard; you'll actually feel and hear the backing pop onto the tackless strip pins.
Use your hammer to set the backing over the tackless strip pins directly in front of the stretcher head.
Use the knee kicker to lightly bump the carpet so it catches on the tackless strip along Wall B parallel to the stretcher (Photo 10).
Stretch the carpet perpendicular to the first stretch and rub it onto the tackless strip.
Tuck the carpet between the tackless strip and the baseboard molding using the back of a linoleum knife (Photo 12).
Order the equivalent amount of pad to go under the carpet and purchase enough tackless strips to go around the perimeter of the room.
You can reuse your existing tackless strips if the wood is solid and the pins are intact.
Wall-to-wall carpet is generally fastened at the perimeter of the room with so called tackless strips.
If your room is carpeted, roll the carpet back out of the way and pry up the tackless strips (wear leather gloves--the barbs on tackless strips are wickedly sharp).