tackle

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tackle

1. any mechanical system for lifting or pulling, esp an arrangement of ropes and pulleys designed to lift heavy weights
2. Nautical the halyards and other running rigging aboard a vessel
3. American football a defensive lineman
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

tackle

[′tak·əl or ′tāk·əl (naval usage)]
(mechanical engineering)
Any arrangement of ropes and pulleys to gain a mechanical advantage.
(naval architecture)
An assemblage of lines and blocks in which the line passes through more than one block.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

tackle

tackle
A mechanism for shifting, raising, or lowering objects or materials, such as a rope and pulley block or an assembly of ropes and pulley blocks.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"I'm sure pro guys wonder if we ever teach tackling," Neal said.
Strong neck muscles play a vital role in preventing injury during tackling or blocking drills where inadvertent headfirst contact is possible.
Canon Burch added: ''Tackling poverty also needs investment.
In an era when square-jawed hard men patrolled football pitches, Greig was one of the toughest around and he fears the art of tackling is being outlawed.
No player shall deliberately use the helmet as the primary point of contact in blocking or tackling (e.g., head butting").
Even the powersyo that-be don't really know the rules about tackling it seems.
And Little understands the view held by many of the former hard men that the art of good tackling is being lost to the game.
We believe it is crucial to mix in these drills with "Team Fly" to teach the concept of tackling a moving target.
Because of the insurance afforded by the sweeper, the markers had been playing tighter and sometimes tackling with criminal intent, knowing that even if they got it wrong, they had cover behind them.
"Then you see a guy tackling with two feet, one is at the level of the knee, the other one is half over the ball.
The new sin bin rule has left referees wide open for criticism in their interpretation of tackling.