tailor


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tailor

1. a person who makes, repairs, or alters outer garments, esp menswear
2. a voracious and active marine food fish, Pomatomus saltator, of Australia with scissor-like teeth
References in classic literature ?
I thanked the tailor for his counsel, and said I would do whatever he advised; then, being very hungry, I gladly ate of the food he put before me, and accepted his offer of a lodging in his house.
In a few days I had quite recovered from the hardships I had undergone, and then the tailor, knowing that it was the custom for the princes of our religion to learn a trade or profession so as to provide for themselves in times of ill-fortune, inquired if there was anything I could do for my living.
But it wants only two days to the fete ; I received the invitation yesterday; made Mouston post hither with my wardrobe, and only this morning discovered my misfortune; and from now till the day after to- morrow, there isn't a single fashionable tailor who will undertake to make me a suit."
"With all my heart," said the tailor; and drawing his hand from under his cloak he showed five caps stuck upon the five fingers of it, and said, "there are the caps this good man asks for; and by God and upon my conscience I haven't a scrap of cloth left, and I'll let the work be examined by the inspectors of the trade."
"He must have been a good tailor," said the Scarecrow, somewhat enviously.
'Oh, if you please, you're to come upstairs,' replied the tailor's daughter, with a smile.
Why, they're stables four times as big as Squire Cass's, for he thought o' nothing but hosses and hunting, Cliff didn't--a Lunnon tailor, some folks said, as had gone mad wi' cheating.
In my case it was method -- not money -- which made the man: at least all of him that was not made by the tailor whom I served.
How much is it, this year, my man?" The tailor had come in while he was speaking.
These lines of Cowley were new to me, but the sentiment was not new, and I marvelled how the old tailor could see through me so well.
Edmund Spenser was born in London in 1552, and was the son of a poor clothworker or tailor. He went to school at the Merchant Taylors' School, which had then been newly founded.
You have only to write to your tailors, or send home for a spare suit of clothes,--with a little managing yours would just fit me, you're not so much taller,--and then we could start, like two comrades, seeking adventures.