tailplane


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tailplane

a small horizontal wing at the tail of an aircraft to provide longitudinal stability

tailplane

tailplane
i. A nearly horizontal airfoil at the tail of an airplane that provides stability in pitching. It has an elevator hinged to its trailing edge. The tailplane can be trimmed from the cockpit.
ii. A pivoted airfoil at the tail of an airplane whose movement up and down is controlled by the pilot through the control column. It has no elevator and can be trimmed besides providing the pitch control for the aircraft. Also called a stabilator
References in periodicals archive ?
The tailplane was found by historian Wolfgang Lohmann in the 70s at Hillegossen, Germany, patching up a roof.
The biggest challenge was to determine drag because it is provided not only by wings, but also by fuselage and tailplane. Other components, like landing gear, windshield etc.
The Hawks' paint scheme incorporates the Union Jack on the tailplane and the Royal Air Force Benevolent Fund logo on the underside.
Given that the aircraft was joining the circuit to land when the accident occurred, the loads on the tailplane are unlikely to have been excessively high at this point.
First Airbus A400M vertical tailplane arrives at EADS Casa facilities in Madrid Apr 18, 2007
tailerons (C) differentially operable ailerons and elevators of an aircraft's tailplane
This plane, the Bleriot VII, was monoplane in configuration, carried a front-mounted engine, a rudder and tailplane to the rear, an enclosed fuselage, and a landing gear assembly featuring two main wheels and a tail wheel.
Budgets and contracts are committed on a total of 180 aircraft which will be assembled in Seville from parts despatched from Britain (wings), Germany (fuselage) France (front cockpit and controls) and Spain (tailplane), although this distribution may be altered in the future.
In addition, icing can affect the control surface effectiveness and aerodynamic balance, which can lead to changes in longitudinal or lateral stability and, ultimately, a wingtip or tailplane stall (Green, 1998; Green et al., 1996).
Electronic countermeasures includes an infrared missile-approach warner and eight chaff/flare dispensers in the bottom of each engine duct between wingroot and tailplane with another in each tailplane root fairing.
The FA-2 has a wing about the size of an F-14 tailplane, so conventional approach speeds tend to be horrific without full flaps.