tailshaft

tailshaft

[′tāl‚shaft]
(naval architecture)
That part of the shaft of a ship's propeller extending through the stern tube.
References in periodicals archive ?
Asry, a leading regional ship and rig repair yard located in Bahrain, has received certification from the American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) for tailshaft cladding and welding.
In a statement yesterday, the yard said the certification affirms that tailshaft repairs done by it are carried out in accordance with the standards and rules of ABS, which is one of the leading global classification societies for quality assurance in marine-related facilities.
The shop offers a full range of large scale boring and milling machines, tailshaft lathes and dynamic balancing equipment.
There have been 19 cases of faulty rear tailshaft support brackets reported, the company said.
''In rural areas, if the vehicle is frequently accelerated or decelerated quickly on rough roads that feature extreme conditions, the rear tailshaft center bearing support brackets may give way,'' Toyota Australia said in a statement.
The truck was a nightmare for the maintenance man--he looked under it one day and saw the tailshaft was about to fall off--and a challenge to drive.
The ship had a riveted steel hull and was propelled by a four-bladed propeller coupled to a tailshaft moved by an alternating triple expansion steam engine built by Maccoll & Pollock, Sunderland.
Each motor has a gear reduction box, a tachometer, and a failsafe electric brake on its tailshaft. Each azimuth drive wheel has two pinions driving its bull gear to apply a counter torque; one rotates in the reverse direction, removing backlash from the gears.
Its managing director, Terry Allen, said that just about everything from the smallest aerospace or automotive application (with torque in the range of a tenth of a Newton-meter) to the largest steel rolling mill or ship tailshaft (where torque measurements of several million Newton-meters are common) have fallen under the gaze of its instruments at one time.
Monitoring speed on the tailshaft side of a belt conveyor, because it is located opposite the driven headshaft, is the quickest way to make sure that the conveyor does not succumb to overload.