care

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CARE

(Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere), nonprofit, nonsectarian federation of agencies devoted to channeling relief and self-help materials to needy people in foreign countries. Organized in the United States (1945) to help war-ravaged Europe, CARE soon expanded its program to include developing nations in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Famous for its "CARE packages" of food and other necessities, CARE in now also involved in population, health care, land management, and small economic activity. It is now an international organization with 10 member countries and headquarters in Brussels.

care

  1. the work involved in supporting people who, because of physical frailty chronic illness or other forms of incapacity and disability, are incapable of leading an autonomous existence.
  2. other kinds of carework, e.g. in child-rearing (see CHILD CARE) and DOMESTIC LABOUR. This should be distinguished from care in sense 1.
Care in sense 1 operates over a wide range of social relations. A clear dividing line can be drawn between formal and informal care (see Abrams, 1978) as it exists in contemporary industrial societies. Formal care refers to services provided by agents of organization (statutory, voluntary and/or private) to people within clearly defined categories of need. Informal care is personally directed towards certain people who have a social relationship with their carer - usually a family member, and most often a spouse (Parker, 1993), or female relative.

Feminist sociologists (see also FEMINISM) have had a major impact on the understanding of care and caring relationships. They have argued that caring is ‘a gendered concept’ and that women constitute the majority of carers both informally, in the private sphere, and as low-paid care workers (‘care assistants’) in the formal sector (Finch and Groves, 1982; Ungerson, 1987; Lewis and Meredith, 1988). Studies of caring have examined the complex reasons why women care and the particular problems and difficulties they face. Social policies involving decarceration and COMMUNITY CARE, the decline of neighbour-hood and COMMUNITY associated with increasing SOCIAL (and geographical) MOBILITY, have placed an increasing burden on individual women carers. There is some evidence that women are reluctant to enter caring relationships with female relatives but lack viable alternatives (Cotterill, 1994). Recent research using data from the 1980 British General Household Survey has also pointed to the significant contribution made by male carers, particularly men who care for their wives (Arber and Gilbert, 1989).

care, custody, and control

Describes a standard exclusion in liability insurance policies. Under this exclusion, the liability insurance does not apply to damage to property in the care or custody of the insured, or to damage to property over which the insured is for any purpose exercising physical control.

CARE

agency devoted to channeling relief to needy people abroad. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 456]

care

in (or into) care Social welfare made the legal responsibility of a local authority by order of a court
References in periodicals archive ?
The District Pastor, Isaac Koda Plange, said taking care of the environment should be everyone's responsibility, and as a major stakeholder, the church would seriously take part in the monthly clean-up exercises and ensure that their various congregations abide and encourage the best environmental care practices.
Mr Lelatisitswe implored Corpus Christi members to understand that their bodies were a temple of God, therefore taking care of their physically well-being was a godly undertaking.
He said the Holy Quran had special directions of taking care of the orphans and giving them honour and dignity.
How is Spears taking care of her mind, body and soul?
In an Instagram post, Barretto thanked her aunt for taking care of her since birth and for loving her and her siblings.
She dedicated her life to taking care of others, but she was the happiest when she was taking care of her family.
Shortly after, the "Cat Man of Aleppo" has become a famous figure in Aleppo as the number of cats he was taking care of increased rapidly.
Summary: Hyderabad (Telangana) [India], Oct 08 (ANI): In a heartwarming gesture, a team of police constables was seen taking care of a six-month-old baby boy while his mother was appearing for exam here.
During his visit to the Ruth Pfau-CHK burns ward, the minister inquired after the health of the child from the staff taking care of him.
Abdul Latif Bin Rashid Al Zayani expressed appreciation to King Salman and the Saudi government for taking care of pilgrims.
de Roeck is a career hotelier and Taking Care of Business was inspired by a real, yet mysterious episode that took place at a restaurant in Nice.
Speaking on the occasion, Rasheed said that Al-Khidmat is serving the humanity by taking care of orphans, adding that this is the responsibility of the government which is being tendered by Al-Khidmat.