talcosis


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talcosis

[tal′kō·səs]
(medicine)
A lung disease caused by inhalation of talc dust and characterized by chronic induration and fibrosis.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Exposure to talc causes talcosis (talco-silicosis or talcoasbestosis if talc is contaminated with silica or asbestos fibers, respectively); inhalation of talc usually results from occupational exposures during talc mining and milling and during production of ceramics, pharmaceuticals, paint, paper, cosmetics, plastics, roofing, rubber, insecticides, and other products (3).
These deaths likely represent nonoccupational pulmonary talcosis caused by illicit inhalation or intravenous administration of talc-contaminated drugs (3,5-7).
However, if cleared insufficiently due to prolonged exposure or exposure to high quantities or both, pulmonary talcosis may develop.
On hospital day 3, he was discharged home on 3 liters of [O.sub.2], levofloxacin 750 mg every other day for 5 days, and fluticasone/salmeterol, in addition to his home medications, with the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease/ pulmonary talcosis, tracheobronchitis, thrombocytopenia, and anemia.
Usage of talcum powders could cause respiratory problems such as Talcosis in infants.
Differential diagnosis includes miliary tuberculosis, lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia, pulmonaryhemosiderosis, amyloidosis, tumour metastasis, sarcoidosis, healed calcified lesions of histoplasmosis and Pneumoconiosis like stanosis, beriliosis, talcosis, silicosis.
Talcosis, whether inhalational or intravenous, is in the differential of bilateral mass-like consolidation but has no zonal predilection.
(96) Inhalation (as opposed to intravenous injection) of talc leads to a condition known as inhalation talcosis or talc pneumoconiosis.
Based on medical and occupational history, physical examination, and results of laboratory and pathology tests, this patient was diagnosed with silicatosis, most probably talcosis. The cause of his lung disease was thought to be related to his working as a carpet installer.
Diffuse Diseases Associated With Nodular Granulomatous Inflammation Sarcoidosis Granulomatous infections Intravenous talcosis Pneumoconioses (eg, inhalation talcosis, berylliosis) Aspiration pneumonia Wegener granulomatosis Table 7.
Known pneumoconioses include coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP), silicosis, asbestosis, mixed dust pneumoconiosis, graphitosis, and talcosis. No effective treatment for these diseases is available (1).
At the Rhode Island plant, the crude incidences of "flock-worker's lung" and of all ILD (including two cases of talcosis and one case of pulmonary histiocytosis X) were 10.5 cases per 1000 person-years and 15 cases per 1000 person-years, respectively.