tall fescue toxicosis

tall fescue toxicosis

[‚tȯl ‚fes·kyü ‚tak·sə′kō·səs]
(veterinary medicine)
A group of several animal disorders caused by grazing on tall fescue infected with the endophytic symbiotic fungus Acremonium coenophialum.
References in periodicals archive ?
Use of nonergot alkaloid-producing endophytes for alleviating tall fescue toxicosis in sheep.
The same endophyte, however, has been associated with tall fescue toxicosis (Hill et al.
Tall fescue toxicosis impacts health, production, and reproduction in livestock (Waller & Fribourg, n.
The nonreproduction effects of tall fescue toxicosis on livestock include:
It is important, therefore, that researchers continue advancing the understanding of tall fescue toxicosis while developing new management practices and technologies (Roberts and Andrae, 2004).
1] were associated with symptoms of tall fescue toxicosis in livestock during winter.
Ergovaline, an ergopeptide closely associated with tall fescue toxicosis (Yates et al.
These new Neotyphodium-free cultivars, initially released to prevent outbreaks of tall fescue toxicosis (Hoveland, 1997; Latch, 1993), also lack persistence (Latch, 1997).
1996) which causes well documented signs of tall fescue toxicosis (Paterson et al.