talus creep

talus creep

[′tal·əs ‚krēp]
(geology)
The slow, downslope movement of talus.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Afterwards, when the talus had formed, other types of mass movements were added (landslide, talus creep, etc.).
The exposure of clayey rocks on the klint and in front of it is a geological precondition for talus creep and landslides.
Using the classification by Hutchinson (1968), the following types of mass movements could be distinguished in the region of the North Estonian Klint: rock falls, rock slides (or block glides), rotational slips, and talus creep.
Talus creep involves the very slow downslope movement of the layers of the talus, which typically occupies the foot of the escarpment, being at its thickest between Kalvi and Paite (Fig.
He also investigated earth slides, mudflows, gullying, talus creep, solifluction, and chemical weathering, to gain a complete picture of how slope denudation occurs under periglacial conditions.