tampon

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tampon

a plug of lint, cotton wool, cotton, etc., inserted into an open wound or body cavity to stop the flow of blood, absorb secretions, etc., esp one inserted into the vagina to absorb menstrual blood
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Tampon

 

a strip or plug of sterile gauze inserted in a wound or body cavity to restrain hemorrhage or to absorb secretions from a wound. Tampons are kept in place for a period of time corresponding to the purpose for which they are used.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

tampon

[′tam‚pän]
(medicine)
A plug of absorbent material, such as cotton or sponge, inserted into a cavity as packing.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tampons, an alternative to traditional sanitary towels, are designed to absorb the menstrual flow after insertion into the female genitalia during menstruation.
Women spend an average of [pounds sterling]18,000 on tampons throughout their lifetime, however, many struggle with period poverty and are unable to cover the cost of this essential item, according to figures fromRIFT Tax Refunds.
"I couldn't even tell what it was until I picked at it, and opened up a hook," Grant told ABC-affiliated TV station WVEC. "I was utterly shocked that there was a hook sticking out of a tampon." 
Quilliam researcher Muna Adil told The Sun that the latest teaching on tampons is "misogynistic, bigoted, and misinformed".
All tampons in both groups were secured to the nose with tape and a 2-0 silk stich--through the anterior edge of the tampon in the Merocel group and through the anterior edge of the glove finger in the glove finger group.
Unlike tampons or disposable pads, the cups are reusable and therefore more cost-effective, she added.
The underwear replaces pads or tampons. You can get styles for different flow days, and some even have a kangaroo pocket for putting in a heating packet for cramps.
Tampons were not classed as essentials when Britain joined the bloc in the 1970s and current EU rules forbid states from adding new items to an approved list of VAT-exempt articles.
Walk down the feminine-hygiene aisle of any drugstore, and you'll be hard-pressed to find a tampon with a cardboard applicator or no applicator at all.
The product, which is meant for external use, is more discreet and stable than a pad, can offer relief for tampon leakage during swimming and other water activities and can even offer an alternative to women who don't use tampons for health or religious concerns.
Major Colin Bradshaw from Darlington told The Northern Echo: "We knew that the women coming to our foodbank for a PS2.50 bag of food might not be able to afford tampons or pads.
When I was young, buying tampons was on a par with buying condoms, excruciating and requiring the discretion of a brown paper bag.