tank ditch

tank ditch

[′taŋk ‚dich]
(ordnance)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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"At the Suez Canal, Israel had the best 'tank ditch' in the Middle East.
The stream was better than a tank ditch, providing a turning obstacle that would slow the enemy armor down.
The "tank ditch" was such a success that the Task Force 9th Engineer Battalion worried that if smugglers came at night, they would be injured if they fell into the ditch.
Obstacles can exist naturally, such as a river or a cliff, or can be man-made such as a minefield or tank ditch. Reinforcing obstacles are placed on the battlefield through military effort and are designed to strengthen the existing terrain to slow, stop, or channel the enemy."
With the petrol tank ditched, there is 200 litres of space for the batteries at the back, with some more at the front, resulting in good weight distribution.
Plus the obstacles which go by terrifying names like Tyre Torture, The Tiger, Battle Tank Ditches, Dead Leg Brook, Vietcong Torture Tunnel and not forgetting the Dreaded Anaconda.
He accounted for every German division's location, manpower and weaponry, accurately describing the tank ditches as "built in a triangular cross section with a span across the top of 5 meters and a depth of 3.5 meters."