tannase


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tannase

[′ta‚nās]
(biochemistry)
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of tannic acid to gallic acid; found in cultures of Aspergillus and Penicillium.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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They also contain catalase, amylase, invertase, lipase, tannase and glucosidase.
Tannins also have toxic effects on some organisms, but they can resist tannins by degrading them into useful derivatives and oligomeric tannins such as gallic acid or pyrogallol using tannase enzyme (3).
Chemical constituents: Catalase, amylase, invertase, tannase, caryophyllene, and a steroid lancamarone, quinine like alkaloid lantanine (Prajapati et al., 2003; Khare, 2007).
Each medium was supplemented with nalidixic acid (25mg x [L.sup.-1]), nystatin (50mg x [L.sup.-1]), and K2Cr2O7 (50mg x [L.sup.- 1]) to inhibit the growth of Gram-negative bacteria and fungi; polyvinyl pyrrolidone (2%) and tannase (0.005%) were also added to improve the development of colonies on media.
studied the antiwrinkle effects of topically applied green tea extract with high antioxidant activity after tannase treatment.
Gaikaiwari, Wagh, & Kulkarni (2012) presented an optimized methodology for reverse micellar extraction and purification of Aspergillus allahabadi intracellular tannase. Under optimized conditions, a 81.2% recovery of tannase was obtained.
Tannase or tannin acyl hydrolase (EC 3.1.1.20) is an inducible enzyme produced by different microorganisms, such as bacteria (OSAWA et al., 2000; MONDAL et al., 2001) and fungi (BANERJEE et al., 2001; SAXENA; SAXENA, 2003; MUKHERJEE; BANERJEE, 2006).
plantarum HEAL19 has pronounced tannase activity and another characteristic is its ability to attach to human mucosa cells in vitro [26].
On the other hand, some microorganisms seem tolerate tannin (Krause et al., 2005) and degrade that phenolic polymer by producing tannase enzyme (Sabu et al., 2006).
The enzyme tannase (tannin acylhydrolase), which specifically breaks the galloyl ester bonds of tannins (Bhat et al., 1998) has been found in some fungal strains (Aoki et al., 1976; Pourrat et al., 1987) as well as in some bacterial species of frequent occurrence in the rumen of goats and sheep fed tannin--rich forage (McSweeney et al, 1999).