tantalum carbide


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tantalum carbide

[′tant·əl·əm ′kär‚bīd]
(inorganic chemistry)
TaC Hard, chemical-resistant crystals melting at 3875°C; used in cutting tools and dies.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tantalum carbide (TaC) is one of the ultrahigh temperature ceramics (UHTC) [1] as it has high melting point (~3983[degrees]C), good electrical and thermal conductivity, and relatively good mechanical properties.
Deason, "Hot pressing of tantalum carbide with and without sintering additives," Journal of the American Ceramic Society, vol.
The applied tungsten carbide (WC), hydroxyl-nickel (Ni), vanadium carbide (VC) and tantalum carbide (TaC) powders, and silicon carbide nanowhisker in this work were all commercially available.
A tantalum carbide graphite composite developed in the United States is thought to be one of the hardest metals ever made."
1) As tantalum carbide, TaC, (one of the hardest man-made substances) for the cutting edges of high-speed machine tools.
Most of the subsequent developments in the hard carbides have been modifications of the original patents, principally involving replacement of part or all of the tungsten carbide with other carbides, especially titanium carbide and/or tantalum carbide. This led to the development of the modern multi-carbide cutting tool materials permitting the high-speed machining of steel.
The more common alloying additions to the basic tungsten/cobalt material are: tantalum carbide and titanium carbide.
Then add to this matrix considerations such as tungsten carbide grain size, binder alloy percentage, and the addition of titanium, tantalum carbide, and other alloying elements.
One carbide manufacturer makes a grade that increases cement strength by reducing the binder to 3% cobalt, the carbide grain size to less than one micron, and incorporates a tantalum carbide additive.
In addition to straight carbide grades, there are also alloyed carbide grades, which may contain titanium carbide, tantalum carbide, or both, and coated-carbide grades.
The consolidation process conducted at an elevated temperature in a graphite die can lead to additional carburization and formation of additional tantalum carbides (Figures 1(e) and 1(f)).
Among their topics are a historical perspective on research, reactive processes for ultra-high temperature ceramics based on diboride, sintering and densification mechanisms, composites for hypersonic applications, deformity and hardness as a function of temperature, the microstructures and deformation behavior of tantalum carbides, the group IV carbides and nitrides, and nuclear applications for ultra-high temperature ceramics and max phases.