tapered joint

tapered joint

[′tā·pərd ′jȯint]
(design engineering)
A firm, leakproof connection between two pieces of pipe having the thread formed with a slightly tapering diameter.
References in periodicals archive ?
If you press one too hard against a tapered joint in the wall, it could bend into the recess, and you could squeeze too much mud out, creating a trough.
The tapered joint also provides a mini-ramp for traffic during construction.
Some slabs are cast with sloping edges to provide a tapered joint, and these should be butted edge to edge.
from the face of the framing, so when you screw the drywall to the blocks, the butt ends are drawn inward, creating a shallow recess that's as easy to finish as a tapered joint.
Unlike the tapered joints along the long edges of drywall, butt joints are tough to finish.
As a result, you'll have only tapered joints to finish.
That way, you'll have several tapered joints to cover, but no butt joints.
Begin with the butt joints first, then the horizontal tapered joints, then the angles and finally, the corner beads.
In contrast, tapered joints along the long sides of drywall have recessed manufactured edges that are much easier to fill and level.
Tapered joints are easy to cover because the two tapered edges of each sheet of drywall leave a pocket that you fill with drywall tape and compound.
If your sheets of drywall were installed the usual (and correct) way--with the long edges parallel to the floor--the tapered joints will run horizontally.