tapioca


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tapioca

(tăpēō`kə), widely used starchy food, obtained from the fleshy root of the bitter cassavacassava
or manioc
, name for many species of the genus Manihot of the family Euphorbiaceae (spurge family). The roots, which resemble sweet potatoes and are eaten in much the same way, yield cassava starch, a staple food in the tropics.
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. Tapioca is sold in flake or flour form and as the pellet pearl tapioca. Tapioca flour is widely used in place of wheat flour in regions where it is grown, e.g., South and Central America, Africa, the West Indies, and parts of India. When cooked it becomes transparent and increases in size. It is used to thicken puddings and soups.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Tapioca

 

starch granules obtained from the tuberous root of cassava, a tropical plant. The starch of the cassava root is refined, pressed through a sieve, and heated on metal plates at a temperature of 150°C; this causes it to become somewhat glutinous and to agglomerate into granules. Tapioca is easily digested and is used in soups, cereals, and other food preparations. It is produced mainly in tropical countries of Asia, Africa, and South America. World production of cassava in 1972 was 105.4 million tons. Certain varieties of sago, such as the Brazilian sago, are sometimes called tapioca.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

tapioca

[‚tap·ē′ō·kə]
(food engineering)
A food, high in starch, that is made from the cassava plant.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
As farinhas de tapioca produzidas em Santarem e Santa Izabel atenderam aos padroes da Legislacao Brasileira, mas apresentaram propriedades fisicas, fisico-quimicas, tecnologicas e morfologicas distintas.
At Bubble T, the drink flavors come in two categories -- "milky" and "slushy." Patrons also get a choice in sugary or caramel tapioca at the bottom of the cup.
To find out the utilization of credit facility by the Tapioca farmers of salem district.
The introduction of periodic dosing of Tapioca fiber residue in to HUASBR and Methanogen rich inoculum resulted 97% reduction of chemical oxygen demand in the reactor and amount of biogas produced in the digester reached ~7.49 m3/m3 of the reactor/day.
Although we did not observe any water droplets on the inside of the acrylic box, some tapioca particles became stuck to the wall, probably because of the water generated.
And if you've never sucked a starchy tapioca ball through a big, fat straw that you've used to pierce a bubble tea cup's plastic covering, then you're missing out.
How can you improve the despised tapioca? We sent Tony Trainor to the Nant Ddu Lodge, near Merthyr Tydfil, yesterday to see if head chef Richard Wimmer was up to the challenge.
SUPERMARKET chain Sainsbury's is launching an environmentally- friendly carrier bag made from tapioca starch - the same product found in tapioca pudding.
From the sweet potato came vinegar, molasses, starch, breakfast food, tapioca, mucilage, crystallized ginger, synthetic rubber, and 100 additional products.
Bubble tea -- that cold, frothy drink filled with chewy tapioca balls -- has popped up over the past year in cafes and kiosks across the nation.
What's got chewy, marble-sized tapioca balls, tastes like ice milk tea and gets sucked through a big, fat straw?
Thailand should meet tapioca production and export targets for this year and next, senior Thai officials said Monday.