tar seep

tar seep

[′tär ‚sēp]
(geology)
Natural tar that, because of its close proximity to the ground surface, seeps from cracks in the earth or from between rocks, often forming pits or pools.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In contrast to other tar seep fossil sites where fossil skeletons are found almost complete or relatively articulated, such as Rancho La Brea (Lindsey & Seymour 2015), the fossil turtles from the TTS are generally found disarticulated and highly fragmented, which indicates that these bones were brought to the tar seep by river activity or small-scale drainage before they were trapped and preserved by the viscous tar.
Pleistocene Fossil Turtles (Testudinoidea, Cryptodira) from the Talara Tar Seeps, Peru
The Talara Tar Seeps (TTS) is an asphaltic paleontological locality that consists of a series of fossil-bearing deposits, late Pleistocene in age between 13616 [+ or -] 600 and 14418 [+ or -] 500 radiocarbon years before present (Churcher 1966), where numerous fossil skeletons of megafauna and other animals have been found (Seymour 2015, Lindsey & Seymour 2015).
The non-passerine Pleistocene avifauna of the Talara tar seeps, northwestern Peru.
Late Pleistocene (Lujanian) occurrence of Tonatia silvicola in the Talara tar seeps, Peru.
Analysis of bat humeri from Late Pleistocene Talara Tar Seeps of northwestern Peru, with paleoenvironmental implications, Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 37:1, e1250097.
Perusing Talara: Overview of the Late Pleistocene Fossils from the Tar Seeps of Peru.
List and measurements of fossil turtle specimens from the Talara Tar Seeps, housed at the ROM collections, Toronto, Canada, identifiable at genus level.
Abstract.--Maricopa is a southern California tar seep with representative flora and fauna of the Pleistocene and Recent periods.
Maricopa is a tar seep (brea) that has received little attention in the literature and is located in the southern San Joaquin Valley southwest of Bakersfield on land owned by the Mobil Oil Company (originally the Standard Oil Company).
Coal tar, a toxic byproduct of a process for extracting gas from coal, is being dredged up from the Erie Canal, near its confluence with Tonawanda Creek, and environmental officials believe the tar seeped into the water from a former coal gasification plant.
Allan Hancock donated to Los Angeles County the 23-acre plot that contained most of the tar seeps. Excavations at the park that bears Hancock's name continued into the mid-1920s.