tardive dyskinesia


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Wikipedia.
Related to tardive dyskinesia: neuroleptic malignant syndrome, tardive dystonia

tardive dyskinesia

[′tär·div ‚dis·kə′nē·zhə]
(medicine)
A movement disorder marked by involuntary twitching of the mouth, lips, tongue, arms, legs, or trunk; frequently associated with the use of neuroleptic drugs.
References in periodicals archive ?
ABSTRACT 409 Deutetrabenazine is Associated with an Improvement in Involuntary Movements in Patients With Tardive Dyskinesia as Seen by the High Proportion of Responders to Deutetrabenazine Treatment in the AIM-TD Study (Poster Session June 6; 1:45pm-3:15pm) J.
DISCUSSION: There are various studies which say that, Tardive dyskinesia incidence was higher with second-generation antipsychotics than previously reported, possibly due to recent studies with relatively short mean durations and use of nonstandard tardive dyskinesia definitions.
Tardive dyskinesia is an incapacitating movement disorder known for causing repetitive and uncontrollable movements of the tongue, lips, face, trunk and extremities.
Valbenazine is the only medication, other than tetrabenazine, to demonstrate efficacy for tardive dyskinesia (TD) in placebo-controlled studies.
Randomized controlled trial of deutetrabenazine for tardive dyskinesia was published online ahead of print in Neurology.
Be on guard for the occurrence of tardive dyskinesia and tardive dystonia].
One-year incidence rates of tardive dyskinesia in children and adolescents treated with second-generation antipsychotics: a systematic review.
In 2009 the Food and Drug Administration required all manufacturers of metoclopramide, the generic name for Reglan, to place stronger warnings on their labels detailing a link between long-term use of the drug and tardive dyskinesia.
Tetrabenazine was first approved in 1971 in the United Kingdom for treating organic movement disorders and tardive dyskinesia, and was approved for treating Huntington's chorea in France in 2005 and in the Netherlands and Germany in 2007.
At a meeting last month, members of the Food and Drug Administration's Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee agreed that the risk of tardive dyskinesia associated with the metoclopramide component of a fixed-dose combination pill outweighed the product's benefits for treating migraines.