target language


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Related to target language: source language

target language

[′tär·gət ¦laŋ·gwij]
(computer science)
The language into which a program (or text) is to be converted.

target language

The language resulting from a translation process such as assembling or compiling. Contrast with source language.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our technology primarily helps identify languages, translate them intelligently into the target language and create rich metadata around it.
The research has shown no evidence of lower attainment in the curriculum taught in the target language (which would be Welsh).
While reflection questions for each chapter in the course book iiTomo are in English, there is nothing to prevent teachers from tackling these or similar questions or tasks in the target language. In this way students will be exposed to the modelling of the target language by the teacher, thus being given the opportunity to analyse and discuss in the target language and engage in authentic language discourse and use.
Since the context of use is what makes the literal meaning stand out as incongruous, the possibility of translation is also dependent upon the literal meaning in the source language and the context of use of the translated linguistic units in the target language. Without this relocation, is it possible to translate a metaphor, just as a collection of words, and still make it "mean" something?
To do this we modeled the system in view and then add a dictionary component that allows translation of code from English to the target language.
After a pretest aimed at assessing L2 proficiency and knowledge of the target language structure, forty-six adult learners of English as a foreign language (EFL) were selected to participate in the study.
She defines the former category as "terms created to designate concepts foreign to the target legal system" and the latter as "terms that actually exist in the target legal system." In other words, a translator may either produce a linguistic equivalent, a term that does not exist as such in the target legal system or intuitively choose a natural equivalent that already exists in the target language. Sarcevic votes in favour of "using the closest natural equivalent of the target legal system, i.e., the equivalent that most accurately conveys the legal sense of the source term and leads to the desired results." (6)
The program does much iteration, each time getting a better answer about the target language. Eventually, it reaches a point where it has deciphered the text.
Every step in the translation process is mediated by the heterogeneous cultural values that circulate in the target language. The translator may submit to or resist dominant values in the target language.
Error analysis was conceptualized and applied based on the behaviourist theory of language learning, which implied that errors were signs that a language learner had simply not learnt the rules of the target language effectively (Brown, 1987).
They found that the pragmatic purpose for learning a second language was derived from a personal desire to know the native speakers of the target language. Second language learners are interested in learning about native speakers of that language and understanding the main purpose of the ways of life in the target language.