tarsal tunnel syndrome


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tarsal tunnel syndrome

[‚tärs·əl ′tən·əl ‚sin‚drōm]
(medicine)
A neurological foot disorder in which the posterior tibial nerve becomes compressed and damaged within the tarsal canal, symptoms include pain and burning that arises from behind the inside of the ankle and that may travel to the bottom of the foot.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, knowing the possible occurrence of this anatomic variation in patients who suffer pathologies in the ankle and foot regions, such as the tarsal tunnel syndrome, as this is the most frequent muscle variation, is crucial in order to make a correct diagnosis and subsequent clinical and surgical treatment.
Moreover, the occurrence of the tarsal tunnel syndrome on the side affected by disc disease is much higher than on the unaffected side (13.2% vs.
We present a patient with features of tarsal tunnel syndrome diagnosed to be secondary to a schwannoma of the posterior tibial nerve.
The presence of AFDL is believed to be associated with tarsal tunnel syndrome [15, 26, 28-30], club foot [31], and flexor hallucis syndrome [32].
Plantar fasciitis does not cause paresthesias or other neurologic symptoms, so their presence is suggestive of a different diagnosis, such as nerve entrapment, compartment syndrome, or tarsal tunnel syndrome. (3,5)
(1) Hyperpronation of the foot is also associated with tarsal tunnel syndrome, though the condition is less common in the general population.
Anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome. Electromyogr Clin Neurophysiol 2000;40:123-8.
The accessory soleus and recurrent tarsal tunnel syndrome: case report of a new surgical approach.
Numbness can occur at different parts of the foot depending on the source of the pressure such as along the arch and inside of the ankle from tarsal tunnel syndrome. If the whole foot goes numb there could be compression on the nerves of the back, such as a compressed disc, sciatic nerve impingement, or pressure over the nerve behind the knee.
It could be: 6 Tarsal tunnel syndrome, when the nerve to the foot is trapped in the tight band that holds structures in place around your ankle.
Posterior tibial tendonitis/dysfunction and tarsal tunnel syndrome are best classified as medial in location (FIGURE 1C).