Tarsus

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Tarsus

(tär`səs, Turk. tärso͝os`), city (1990 pop. 191,333), S Turkey, in Cilicia, on the Tarsus (anc. Cydnus) River, near the Mediterranean Sea. It is an agricultural trade center; copper, zinc, chromium, and coal are mined in the region. Ancient Tarsus, first mentioned in the 8th cent. B.C., was the capital of Cilicia and one of the most important cities of Asia Minor. It reached the height of its prosperity and cultural achievement under Roman rule. The city was destroyed by the Arabs c.A.D. 660 and was rebuilt by them in the 780s. It was captured by the Ottoman Turks in 1515. The apostle Paul was born there.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Tarsus

 

in arthropods, the penultimate (distal) segment of the limb, usually in movable articulation with the tibia, rarely merging with it into a single segment (tibiotarsus). In most insects, the tarsus consists of one to five subsegments, of which the last one usually bears two ungues (more rarely, one) on its tip. In the Scutigera the tarsus consists of numerous small articles. Sometimes there are special appendages under the ungues that serve as suckers when crawling on smooth objects.


Tarsus

 

a city in southern Turkey, in feel Province; situated along a railroad and a highway connecting Adana with Mersin. Population, 75,000 (1970). Tarsus is the commercial center of a major cotton-growing region. Industries include cotton ginning, textile manufacturing, cement production, and food processing.


Tarsus

 

an ancient city in what is now Turkey, near the modern town of the same name; the site was inhabited from the sixth millennium B.C. to the third or fourth century A.D. Excavations at Gözlükule, conducted between 1934 and 1938, established that a settlement existed at the site of Tarsus during the Neolithic period, in the sixth to fifth millennia B.C. In the fourth millennium, Tarsus came under the increasing influence of the El-Obeid culture; in the third millennium it was a fortified town with a developed metallurgical industry; in the second millennium it apparently became a part of the Hittite state, as evidenced by Hittite seals found there. Iron implements, such as axes, adzes, and weapons, first appeared in Tarsus between 1100 B.C. and 850 B.C. and were widely distributed from 850 B.C. to 700 B.C. In the seventh century B.C., Tarsus was part of Assyria. Tombs from the Hellenistic and Roman eras have been excavated from the city’s upper layers.

REFERENCE

Excavations at Gözlü Kule: Tarsus, vols. 1–3. Princeton, N.J., 1950–63. (Contains bibliography.)
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

tarsus

[′tär·səs]
(anatomy)
The instep of the foot consisting of the calcaneus, talus, cuboid, navicular, medial, intermediate, and lateral cuneiform bones.
The dense connective tissues supporting an eyelid.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

tarsus

1. the bones of the ankle and heel, collectively
2. the corresponding part in other mammals and in amphibians and reptiles
3. the dense connective tissue supporting the free edge of each eyelid
4. the part of an insect's leg that lies distal to the tibia

Tarsus

1. a city in SE Turkey, on the Tarsus River: site of ruins of ancient Tarsus, capital of Cilicia, and birthplace of St. Paul. Pop.: 231 000 (2005 est.)
2. a river in SE Turkey, in Cilicia, rising in the Taurus Mountains and flowing south past Tarsus to the Mediterranean. Length: 153 km (95 miles)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
34, 35) variable shades of dark brown, with thick scopulae on tarsi and metatarsi I--II; tibia I with cluster of 3 pro-distal macrosetae and row of 5 long retro-ventral macrosetae; metatarsus I with 4 ventral macrosetae; ventral tarsus I with distal cluster of 6 short macrosetae.
Scopulae: All tarsi, 100% scopulate, metatarsi I-II 90%, metatarsi III 50% and metatarsi IV 25% scopulate.
All legs covered with very weakly barbed or nude setae; setulose setae arise along ventral and ventro-lateral surface of tarsi. Specialized setae of leg I: Ge 3[sigma] + 1[kappa], Ti 4[phi] + 1[kappa], Ta 1[omega] (in dorsal position), 12-14[omega] (placed laterally) + 2-3[zeta] + 1[epsilon]; leg II: Ge 1-2[sigma] + 1[kappa], Ti 3-4[phi], Ta 2-3[omega] + 2[zeta]; leg III: Ge 1-2[sigma], Ti 2[phi], Ta 1[omega] + 2[zeta]; leg IV: Ge 2[sigma], Ti 2[sigma], Ta 2[zeta]; along the ventral surface of tarsi, several eupathidium-like setae, similar to other setulose setae but with blunt tip present; these setae are especially numerous on tarsus I.
Tibiae and tarsi yellow green with darker green longitudinal markings proximally, (drying brightyellow); all spines, spurs and claws tipped with black.
57, 58) variable shades of tan, with light scopulae on tarsi I-II; metatarsus I and tarsus I lighter in color; tibia I heavily spinose, without prolateral clasping spurs.
can be distinguished from Agnostopelma Perez-Miles & Weinmann 2010 by the absence of the type IV urticating setae, the presence of scopulae on tarsi IV (absent in Agnostopelma), the presence of two subapical apophyses on tibia I (none in Agnostopelma), the different morphology of male palpal bulb (embolus long and tapering, projecting retrolaterally from tegulum in Bistriopelma gen.
Setae and solenidia on legs I-IV segments: coxae 0-0-0-0, trochanters 0-0-1-0, femora 1-1-0-0, genua 2-2-1-0, tibiae 3-3-1-1, tarsi 10-7-5-4.
We hypothesized that waveform NP could be caused by structural features of the psyllid tarsi, perhaps scratching, grasping or otherwise making close contact with the plant surface, such that minor electrical conductivity occurred between the insect and electrified plant.
A tarsal coalition Residual pain in the sinus tarsi after the original sprain heals can also be due to an unrecognized tarsal coalition.
In gonyleptoidean harvestmen, the morphology of the TAPs is very similar between tarsi III and IV and does not differ markedly between the prolateral and retrolateral surfaces (Gainett et al.
Scopulae: All tarsi, 100% scopulate, metatarsi I 50%, metatarsi II 25%, metatarsi III 15% scopulated, metatarsi IV ascopulate.