Tarsometatarsus

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Tarsometatarsus

 

a bone in birds located between the ti bia and the toes. The tarsometatarsus is formed by the concrescence of the third tarsal bone with the three middle (second through fourth) metatarsal bones that are concresced lengthwise. In Archeopteryx the metatarsal bones were free. In some adult extant birds, for example, penguins and frigate birds, the tarsometatarsus has traces of concrescence—openings and little grooves between the metatarsal bones. The length of the tarsometatarsus differs in different species of birds; for example, in climbing parrots it is very short, and in marsh birds it is the same length as the long tibias. The males of some Galliformes have a spur on the dorsal side of the tarsometatarsus. The fossils of giant reptiles (predatory dinosaurs), whose legs reveal a convergent resemblance to the legs of birds, also had a tarsometatarsus similar to that of birds.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chick 1 had multiple orthopedic abnormalities, including deviation of the distal keel to the left, bilateral swelling of the tibiotarsaltarsometatarsal joints, and prominent lateral swellings of the proximal metaphyses of the tarsometatarsi. Chick 2 had a 15[degrees] tibiotarsaltarsometatarsal valgus abnormality and external rotation of the left leg.
Chick 1 demonstrated increased radiolucency of the long bones of the right and left leg with the proximal metaphyses of the tarsometatarsi most severely affected.
Elastic tape stripes, measuring 1 cm wide, were placed on the medial and lateral aspect of the leg extending from the mid tibiotarsus to the distal tarsometatarsi. The lateral, elastic tape stripes were placed under 15% tension, and the medial stripes were placed with 0% tension across the tibiotarsal-tarsalmetatarsal joint.
Lesions resembling knemidokoptic mange on the feet and tarsometatarsi of 2 Hawaiian amakihi (Hemignathus virens) were observed while the researchers were mist netting wild passerines at Manuka Natural Area Reserve on the island of Hawaii between June 14, 2007 and June 19, 2007.